This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

Skip to main content

Talk to an expert 1-800-242-2434 Lines open now

User menu
Malawi
Malawi
Malawi
Malawi
Malawi
Malawi

Lake Malawi, the most southerly Rift Valley's great lakes, perfect for a myriad water activities

A wildlife success story, the revival of Liwonde National Park

Lake Malawi's Marelli Archipelago - perfect for water activities

Liwonde National Park, the sluggish Shire River offers great game viewing options

Lake Malombe, one of Africa's breathtaking Great Rift Valley freshwater lakes

Lake Malawi National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site - forget the Caribbean!

Malawi

Malawi holidays and safaris

At the foot of the African Rift Valley, Malawi’s image is often defined by the translucent waters of Lake Malawi.

Malawi

Stretching to almost 600km, the lake runs like a backbone down the country. Children play along the lakeshore, the warm sand lapped by crystal-clear waters. Beneath the surface, fresh-water cichlids abound, as in a huge natural aquarium: a must for curious snorkellers.

Islands dotting the lake are a magnet for adventurous kayakers, while further afield, the unexpected treasures of Likoma Island, with its imposing Anglican cathedral, reward a leisurely boat trip.

Spreading out from the lake, fertile soils form rolling farmlands, and towering above are the mountains: three high plateaux whose lush wilderness attracts the discerning visitor to walk and hike in near exclusivity.

In this diverse environment, wildlife abounds. Hippos and crocs are in their element in the tropical Shire River as it flows alongside Majete Wildlife Reserve and on through the bird-rich Liwonde National Park – both now home once again to the “big five”. Equally good for birding is the high-altitude Nyika Plateau, while the rugged Nkhotakota is an emerging “must” for wildlife enthusiasts.

Throughout the country, Malawi’s attractions are intrinsically bound up with its natural beauty. This is a place to explore at leisure: on foot, by canoe, by sailboat. To marvel at waterfalls in the wilderness. To interact with a genuinely welcoming people. Perhaps simply to stop and unwind. “The warm heart of Africa” is a fitting description.

Malawi: the key destinations

For many, the stand-out is Lake Malawi, one of the largest lakes in the world and home to hundreds of species of colourful cichlids, many endemic to the lake. Fringed by soft, sandy shores, it’s a mecca for snorkellers, divers, kayakers and – of course – beach lovers.

Arguably the best place for a traditional safari in Malawi, Majete Wildlife Reserve is a real conservation success story and here both driving and walking safaris can take you in search of the “big five”.

More established is the lush, tropical Liwonde National Park, which lines the Shire River – a languid waterway patrolled by hippos and crocs. Elephant roam the banks, and the birdlife is prolific.

Similarly popular with birders – and hikers – are the highlands of Nyika National Park, a refreshing haven after a hot safari, while Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve appeals especially to adventurous travellers looking for a wildlife haven which is, as yet, seldom visited.


Card image

Lakeshore

7 places to stay

Tucked into secluded coves or built on rocky islands there are plenty of places to stay on Lake Malawi. It is ideal for a relaxing beach stay after a safari.

Card image

Liwonde

3 places to stay

Malawi's wildlife areas are resurgent, with significant reintroductions and intensive conservation efforts. If you are looking for game viewing close to Lake Malawi, then Liwonde National Park is ideal.

Card image

Nyika Plateau

2 places to stay

The Nyika National Park protects a large area of rich rolling grasslands, noted for endemic orchids, heathers and wild flowers, as well as roan, eland and other plains game.

Card image

Likoma Island

2 places to stay

Likoma Island in Lake Malawi offers sandy beaches and secluded coves with some of the best snorkelling and diving in Malawi. It also has one of Africa's largest cathedrals.

Card image

Lilongwe

2 places to stay

Lilongwe is the capital of Malawi, and is usually used as an overnight stop . Most travellers will pass through here at least once on their way to safari or beach.

Card image

Blantyre

1 places to stay

The capital of Malawi's Southern Region and the country’s financial and commercial centre, Blantyre is usually a one night stop for flight connections from the south of the country.

Card image

Malawi Interior

1 places to stay

Malawi's interior covers a large area although we feature relatively little here. The Zomba Plateau is a real highlight with stunning scenery, forests and waterfalls.

Card image

Majete

1 places to stay

This large, rugged reserve has been recently regenerated though intensive animal reintroductions and conservation work; it's Malawi's most interesting wildlife area and home to the Big Five.

Card image

Nkhotakota

1 places to stay

Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve is Malawi’s oldest, largest and least-developed wildlife reserve. However, recent intensive conservation work and animal translocations is bringing new life to this reserve.

Our top ten Malawi holidays

All our holidays to Malawi are tailormade; these are just our suggestions to help you decide where to go.

For many travellers, the perfect combination is to spend a few days on safari, then to finish your trip by the clear waters of Lake Malawi – snorkelling, sailing or simply relaxing on the beach.

For others, no trip to southern Africa would be complete without seeing the majestic Victoria Falls, which can fit in well with Zambia's premier safari destination, South Luangwa National Park. Still others want the luxury of focusing on Likoma Island for a few days, or hiking in Nyika, or .... For such a small country, Malawi has plenty of options.

Look through our suggestions for trips below, then contact us and let us help to create a Malawi holiday especially for you.


Itinerary image

Utaka Cichlid Safari

10 days • 3 locations
BLANTYRE AIRPORT TO LILONGWE AIRPORT

Explore two of Malawi's safari parks - Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park - before finishing your trip with some beach time: relaxing, snorkelling and sailing in Lake Malawi National Park.

US$4,340 - US$5,700 per person

Itinerary image

Red Zebra Cichlid Safari

7 days • 2 locations
BLANTYRE AIRPORT TO LILONGWE AIRPORT

Explore two of Malawi's highlights, with a safari in rugged, remote Majete Wildlife Reserve before some beach time: relaxing, snorkelling and sailing in Lake Malawi National Park.

US$3,400 - US$4,500 per person

Itinerary image

Hyena Safari

11 days • 4 locations
VICTORIA FALLS AIRPORT TO LILONGWE AIRPORT

Mix relaxation and adventure on a safari combining the South Luangwa with Victoria Falls and the beaches of Lake Malawi. These three locations are among the most iconic in southern Africa.

US$8,630 - US$11,910 per person

Itinerary image

Peacock Cichlid Safari

4 days • 1 locations
LILONGWE AIRPORT TO LILONGWE AIRPORT

Snorkel in Lake Malawi’s famously clear fresh water, relax on the beach and explore Likoma Island from the award-winning Kaya Mawa. A chilled luxury add-on to end your safari.

US$3,430 - US$4,480 per person

Our travellers' most recent reviews of their Malawi holidays

Many of our travellers take the time to send us feedback on their trips to Malawi and other countries: something that is very important to us.

All of these reviews are published in full and unedited on our website. See all 93 Malawi holiday reviews here, or click on a card below to read one of our most recent reviews in full.

This feedback helps us to keep bang up to date, and is valuable in helping other travellers to plan their trips. It is also read with interest by lodges in Malawi, who appreciate constructive feedback that is based on personal experience.


98%
93 reviews since August 2007
Excellent
86
Good
6
Average
1
Poor
0
Terrible
0
Mr F from Hampshire

Arrived 28 May 2024, 17 nights

"My May 2024 trip"

"Wonderful experience …" Read Mr F’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

Samantha from Brazil

Arrived 20 Nov 2023, 4 nights

"My Nov 2023 trip"

"Couldn't be more happy about my experience with Expert Africa …" Read Samantha’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

A&S from Northampton

Arrived 1 Sep 2023, 20 nights

"My Sep 2023 trip"

"whole trip was great and well organised …" Read A&S’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

Mr & Mrs H from Kent

Arrived 12 Aug 2023, 18 nights

"My Aug 2023 trip"

"It was a very enjoyable trip with plenty of sights …" Read Mr & Mrs H’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

Miss S. from Brockenhurst

Arrived 1 Aug 2023, 15 nights

"My Aug 2023 trip"

"I always love returning to Zambia & it was my 9th visit …" Read Miss S.’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

Mr & Mrs V. from Leiden

Arrived 24 Apr 2023, 11 nights

"My Apr 2023 trip"

"This was our fifth trip with EA and we started to plan our sixth one immediately …" Read Mr & Mrs V.’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

Mr & Mrs. E. from Zurich

Arrived 11 Nov 2022, 18 nights

"Malawi & Zambia in Nov 2022"

"We would choose Expert Africa any day as we consider them to be the best …" Read Mr & Mrs. E.’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

Miss H & Dr B from London

Arrived 18 Sep 2022, 13 nights

"Big birthday Africa trip 2022"

"EA are very best.. knowledge & experience is exceptional.. advice is accurate.. …" Read Miss H & Dr B’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

Mr & Mrs H from W. Sussex

Arrived 15 Sep 2022, 15 nights

"Our Sep 2022 trip to Zambia and Malawi"

"a fantastic way to celebrate our Ruby Wedding anniversary …" Read Mr & Mrs H’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

Mr & Mrs H from Kent

Arrived 19 Sep 2022, 19 nights

"My Sep 2022 trip"

"one of our best ever holidays... Claire's itinerary could not be faulted... …" Read Mr & Mrs H’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

See all Malawi reviews

Our travellers' wildlife sightings across Malawi

A wildlife safari is at the heart of many trips to Malawi, and many travellers keep records of their sightings, from elephant and hippo to lion and zebra.

On their return, they share these records with us, and its then included on this site. Thus we have built up a unique picture of where and when you’re likely to see Malawi’s key wildlife species. This is truly citizen science in action.

Read how this survey works.

For much greater detail of what you’re likely to see from individual camps and lodges, take a look at our interactive map showing the the best locations for wildlife species in Malawi.


Elephant

100% success

Sable antelope

94% success

Hippo

82% success

Eland

78% success

Zebra

77% success

Buffalo

53% success

Lion

50% success

Roan antelope

33% success

Cheetah

27% success

Leopard

22% success

Spotted Hyena

18% success

Giraffe

17% success

Black Rhino

12% success

Wild dog

0% success

Wildebeest

0% success

Pangolin

0% success

Aardvark

0% success

Where to find Malawi’s key wildlife species

Malawi may not spring immediately to mind for a safari, but since the turn of the millennium, the wildlife has steadily been improving – and so have our visitors’ sightings.

You can find the results of these in many ways across our website. Check out our wildlife sightings and reviews for individual camps and reserves; take a look at our maps or individual holiday pages; or see our dedicated wildlife pages.

Whether you’re in search of lion or leopard, zebra or the beautiful sable antelope, take a look at our data and discover the best places to seek them out.

For a map of the best camps and lodges for sightings of a given animal species, click on a card:


Elephant

Elephant

Loxodonta africana

By far the biggest of the so-called Big Five – indeed, the largest land animal on the planet – the elephant shapes the very landscape it inhabits and is a defining presence on any safari.

91% SUCCESS

3,662 sightings from 4,032 observations

Where to see elephant in Malawi

Leopard

Leopard

Panthera pardus

The most numerous of Africa’s big cats, leopard occur across many habitats, from wild tracts to populated areas. Their grace and their elusive nature make them a unique safari drawcard.

47% SUCCESS

1,958 sightings from 4,180 observations

Where to see leopard in Malawi

Lion

Lion

Panthera leo

Lions are at the top of the food chain and also most safari wish-lists, but with their numbers falling fast, any encounter with these majestic apex predators always feels like a privilege.

81% SUCCESS

3,057 sightings from 3,767 observations

Where to see lion in Malawi

Cheetah

Cheetah

Acinonyx jubatus

The cheetah is the fastest land animal and the only cat that hunts by pure speed. Found largely in open grasslands, its slim, elegant form is today an increasingly rare sight.

33% SUCCESS

1,055 sightings from 3,211 observations

Where to see cheetah in Malawi

Wild dog

Wild dog

Lycaon pictus

African wild dogs are among the continent’s most compelling animals. Much misunderstood, these rare, tie-dyed canids are amazingly efficient hunters with a fascinating social life.

32% SUCCESS

883 sightings from 2,800 observations

Where to see wild dog in Malawi

Spotted Hyena

Spotted Hyena

Crocuta crocuta

The spotted hyena may be thought of as ‘ugly’ and ‘cowardly’. In fact, this versatile and intelligent carnivore is one of Africa’s most fascinating and warrants attention on any safari.

55% SUCCESS

2,187 sightings from 3,979 observations

Where to see spotted hyena in Malawi

Black Rhino

Black Rhino

Diceros bicornis

The black rhino is the smaller and rarer of Africa’s two rhino species but has the more fearsome reputation. Shy and heavily persecuted, it tends to stick to cover.

30% SUCCESS

626 sightings from 2,062 observations

Where to see black rhino in Malawi

Giraffe

Giraffe

Giraffa camelopardalis

The world’s tallest land mammal, giraffes are herbivores which have evolved many unique adaptations. Their iconic outlines tower above the bush in many of Africa’s wildlife areas.

86% SUCCESS

3,533 sightings from 4,110 observations

Where to see giraffe in Malawi

Buffalo

Buffalo

Syncerus caffer

One of the ‘Big Five’, buffalo earned a fearsome reputation in hunters’ tales. By contrast, big herds of these sociable bovids are placid, but mount formidable defences against predators.

83% SUCCESS

2,581 sightings from 3,117 observations

Where to see buffalo in Malawi

Hippo

Hippo

Hippopotamus amphibius

The territorial calls of the hippo create a signature soundtrack to Africa’s rivers & wetlands. Despite an endearing smile, this aquatic herbivore has a notoriously aggressive disposition.

89% SUCCESS

2,673 sightings from 2,998 observations

Where to see hippo in Malawi

Sable antelope

Sable antelope

Hippotragus niger

Perhaps Africa’s most beautiful antelope, sable are renowned for their combative nature, even holding off lions. Shy and restricted in range, sightings of sable are always special.

23% SUCCESS

462 sightings from 2,040 observations

Where to see sable antelope in Malawi

Eland

Eland

Taurotragus oryx

Africa’s largest antelope, eland are culturally important from prehistoric rock art to modern game farms. Though widespread, they are also shy so sightings are uncommon and often fleeting.

49% SUCCESS

1,468 sightings from 2,998 observations

Where to see eland in Malawi

Roan antelope

Roan antelope

Hippotragus equinus

Africa’s second largest antelope and one of its most handsome, with a powerful build and distinctive markings, roan are wary of people, but renowned for their bravery against predators.

23% SUCCESS

480 sightings from 2,047 observations

Where to see roan antelope in Malawi

Wildebeest

Wildebeest

Connochaetes sp.

Superficially bovine in appearance, wildebeests are known for their spectacular migrations sometimes in huge numbers. These resilient animals are some of Africa’s most successful herbivores.

68% SUCCESS

2,507 sightings from 3,703 observations

Where to see wildebeest in Malawi

Zebra

Zebra

Equus sp.

The zebra is a quintessential African animal: the horse in stripy pyjamas at the end of every child’s A–Z. There are three species, of which the plains zebra is much the most common.

84% SUCCESS

3,860 sightings from 4,587 observations

Where to see zebra in Malawi

Pangolin

Pangolin

Smutsia sp.

Pangolins appear to be more pine cone than animal in their unique armoury of scales. These nocturnal, ant-eating oddities are not only highly elusive but also increasingly rare.

2% SUCCESS

55 sightings from 3,356 observations

Where to see pangolin in Malawi

Aardvark

Aardvark

Orycteropus afer

The aardvark is one of Africa’s most bizarre and enigmatic animals. A shy, nocturnal termite-eater, signs of its presence may be scattered about the bush whilst sightings remain elusive.

2% SUCCESS

69 sightings from 3,349 observations

Where to see aardvark in Malawi

Which is the best month to visit Malawi?

The best time to visit Malawi depends on many things, including interests, the length of a visit and the reasons for travelling. One person's top time to go to Malawi can be another person's worst!

A Malawi safari is generally best between May and October, when it’s mostly dry. The cool temperatures of June and July rise in September and October, notably in low-lying areas such as Liwonde National Park and along the shores of Lake Malawi.

Typically the rains start around November, but this can still be a good time for a safari – and it’s less busy than during the northern-hemisphere school holidays. This season is also excellent for birdwatching, although many camps close around Christmas until April or May.

Lake Malawi is an all-year-round destination, but can be at its most appealing between September and April, when temperatures are generally warm and snorkelling is at its best.

Click on the months below; see rainfall and temperatures here.


Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Malawi in January

January is the middle of the rainy season in Malawi. You can expect heavy rain for a few hours most days with some occasional flooding. It is generally hot and wet, with temperatures reaching over 30ºC.

The landscape is green and lush and the air crystal clear. In the game reserves the thick bush can restrict animal sightings, making game viewing more challenging. With the abundance of water available the wildlife disperses and is no longer concentrated around water sources. However, many species give birth at this time of the year and it is a great time for birding.

Although the majority of the safari camps are open at this time, most of the beach lodges along the lakeshore close in mid January.

  • Peak of the rainy season with thundershowers most days
  • Many animals are with young & birdlife is at its most spectacular
  • Bush lush & green; animals dispersed so game viewing more difficult
  • Air is clear & dust-free, which is great for photography
  • Majority of lakeside beach lodges are closed second half of January

Our view

This is not a great time to visit

Weather in January

Malawi in February

February is generally the wettest month and still the heart of the rainy season, with dramatic thunderstorms interspersed with sunny spells.

Expect some flooding and the ground to be waterlogged. The thick bush still affects game viewing on land, and walking safaris are limited, but game viewing by boat on the swollen Shire River, in both Liwonde National Park and Majete Game Reserve, is a highlight. Birdlife is also at its most spectacular at this time of year.

Visitor numbers and costs at the few open camps are low. Most of the beach lodges remain closed, with only one or two open all year.

  • Peak of the rainy season with thundershowers most days
  • The bush feels alive; birdlife is at its most spectacular
  • Good for photography but poor game viewing
  • Few tourists, so rates usually at their lowest
  • Majority of lakeside beach lodges are still closed

Our view

This is not a great time to visit

Weather in February

Malawi in March

The rainy season is nearing the end in Malawi. The thunderstorms become fewer with sunnier days, but you can still expect some rain most days. March is one of the last of the summer months with temperatures still around 25–30ºC most days.

On safari the thick bush still restricts game viewing and walking safaris are limited too, with the larger animal species being quite elusive. On the plus side, migrant birds make the most of the abundant insect life. This time of the year is also great for keen photographers with the vivid green landscape and clear, dust-free air.

The beach lodges are also starting to open again around mid-March, following the rainy season.

  • Expect to experience some rain most days
  • The bush feels alive, with birdlife still a highlight
  • Good for photography but game viewing remains poor
  • With few tourists, rates generally at their lowest
  • Beach lodges now open from mid-March

Our view

This is not a great time to visit

Weather in March

Malawi in April

April is a month of change in Malawi. The days start to cool down, rainfall decreases, and summer turns into autumn as the dry season approaches. Temperatures drop to around 25 ºC during the day with the evenings becoming cooler.

This is the tail-end of the green season and, after five months of rain, the landscape remains green and lush, with game viewing still a challenge. However, the birdlife is still great, and the improving weather attracts more visitors to both the bush and the beaches along the Malawi lakeshore.

  • The temperatures are cooling down but still expect the odd rain shower
  • Start of the dry season with mostly clear and sunny days
  • Bush still green & lush: good for photography but not for game viewing
  • Very few visitors, and still one of the cheapest times to visit
  • The lakeshore beach lodges are now all open

Our view

A good time to visit, with pros & cons

Weather in April

Malawi in May

May is the end of summer and the first month of the dry season. There may still be the occasional shower, but clear sunny skies are becoming the norm. As winter approaches, daytime temperatures drop to a comfortable 20–25 ºC, but at night they’re down to around 10ºC, so warm clothing is advisable for early- morning game drives.

As the rain disappears the landscape starts to dry out. Although the vegetation is still thick, the game viewing starts to improve and walking safaris becoming more reliable. Birding is still excellent, too. Around the lakeshore, temperatures can be significantly warmer, making beach holidays popular at this time of the year. Yet visitor numbers remain low, making May one of the most cost-effective times to visit.

  • Start of the dry season with mostly clear & sunny days
  • Temperatures are mild along the lakeshore so good for a beach stay
  • Bush still green & lush but game viewing improving
  • Good for photography & great birdlife
  • Very few visitors, & still one of the cheapest times to visit

Our view

A good time to visit, with pros & cons

Weather in May

Malawi in June

June is entirely in the dry season, and – along with May – can also be one of the coldest months. With no rain, clear skies and temperatures dropping to around 20–25ºC during the day, the nights can be cold, reaching around 10ºC. Warm clothing is advisable for early-morning and late-afternoon game drives.

The landscape remains lush, but the bush starts to die back significantly, bringing a marked improvement in wildlife viewing. This, along with cooler temperatures, makes June ideal for walking safaris. Temperatures around the lakeshore tend to be significantly warmer, so June is another popular month for beach holidays with higher visitor numbers.

  • Well into the dry season with sunny days & cool temperatures
  • Thick bush is dying back, & game viewing improves
  • Increased visibility & cool weather perfect for walking safaris
  • Mild temperatures along the lakeshore: good for a beach stay
  • June is still low season : a popular time before high season starts

Our view

A very good time to visit

Weather in June

Malawi in July

July is the middle of the dry season in Malawi, with temperatures starting to pick up towards the end of the month. This makes July a good time for both safaris and beach holidays. Expect it to be pleasant during the day but still cold at night, especially at high altitude such as Nyika Plateau; blankets and hot water bottles are often provided on safari.

As the vegetation dies back, animals start to congregate around perennial water sources, making this one of the best times of year for game viewing.

July is also the start of high season and all the camps increase their rates to make the most of the improving game and the start of the international holiday period.

  • Warm dry days with crisp cold nights
  • Significantly improved game viewing
  • No limit on walking safaris, with pleasant temperatures a plus
  • Temperatures along the lakeshore ideal for beach and watersports
  • Approaching peak season, so significant increase in costs

Our view

A very good time to visit

Weather in July

Malawi in August

August is well into the dry season with game concentrated around water sources and the safari season approaching its best. The landscape is changing from green to brown and the air is becoming drier and dustier. There is also a lot of smoke in the air as burning of trees and vegetation is prevalent in Malawi, so this isn’t the best time for photography.

Later in August the temperatures start to pick up, but early mornings and late evenings are still cooler – particularly out on open game drives where warm jackets, gloves and scarves are recommended. August is one of the most popular months. Pleasant weather and good game viewing attracts lots of visitors, and costs are correspondingly high.

  • Warm dry days with crisp cold nights still the norm
  • Game viewing at its best
  • No limits on walking safaris, with pleasant temperatures a bonus
  • Lakeshore temperatures remain good for beach and water sports
  • Still peak season, with attendant high costs

Our view

Fantastic: the very best time to visit

Weather in August

Malawi in September

This is the most popular time of the year for a safari. There has been no rain for months and temperatures are starting to increase, making morning and evening game drives more comfortable. Daytime temperatures are now above 30ºC and evening temperatures relatively mild.

Game viewing is at its best with the animals concentrating around the reducing water sources, making wildlife interactions more common. With the increasing heat the air becomes more hazy, reducing photographic opportunities and distant views.

This is a good time to finish a safari with some relaxing time along the Malawi lakeshore. Costs, though, are high, and camps can be booked up months in advance.

  • Dry & hot during the day with clear skies & warm nights
  • One of the best months for wildlife viewing
  • Dust & smoke creates a haze; not great for photography
  • Temperatures along the lakeshore perfect for beach and watersports
  • Peak season; camps are expensive & often full well in advance

Our view

Fantastic: the very best time to visit

Weather in September

Malawi in October

This is the last month of the dry season: the start of summer with temperatures peaking over 40ºC during the day and hardly less than 20ºC at night. This makes early-morning and late-evening game drives more comfortable but can be terribly hot during the day and makes walking safaris very challenging.

The landscape is very dry and brown, so not ideal for photography, but game viewing remains at its best. With the lack of water the animals are all vying for the best spot to drink without being preyed upon.

October is the perfect time to finish a safari with some relaxing time along the Malawi lakeshore. It is still peak season, though, and costs remain high.

  • Dry, hot days with clear skies; warm nights
  • One of the best months for wildlife viewing
  • The haze from dust & smoke is not great for photography
  • Warm lakeshore temperatures still good for beach & watersports
  • Peak season; camps are expensive & often full well in advance

Our view

A very good time to visit

Weather in October

Malawi in November

November marks the end of the dry season and the start of the rainy season. Temperatures continue to increase with humidity building as the rains approach, which can be any time during the month. Be prepared for spectacular thunderstorms and short sharp showers.

After the first rains the bush springs back to life and wildlife disperses, making game viewing harder. Birding, though, is on the up – and with the air washed clean, photographic opportunities improve.

The first week or two are a good time to travel as the camps have reduced their rates and rains may not have started in earnest. However, while all the camps and beach lodges remain open some of the airstrips may become waterlogged, making road transfers more practical.

  • Typically the start of the wet season; very hot & humid
  • Increased chance of heavy rain as the month progresses
  • Greatly diminished game viewing once the rains arrive
  • A good time for photographers & keen birders
  • Lower rates at camps and beach lodges, with fewer visitors

Our view

A good time to visit, with pros & cons

Weather in November

Malawi in December

December is the first full month of the rainy season, with daily thundershowers expected, interspersed with sunny spells. Temperatures are around 30ºC with high humidity.

After a few weeks of rain, the abundance of standing water causes animals to disperse and the bush becomes thicker and greener, reducing visibility for game viewing. Conversely, this is when many animals produce their young, and is a great time for birdwatching. The rain also clears the air of dust and smoke, making it much more favourable for keen photographers.

December is still a good month to be along the lakeshore provided you don’t mind the afternoon rain showers.

  • Very hot & humid
  • Increased chance of heavy rain as the month progresses
  • Opportunities for game viewing decrease with the arrival of the rains
  • A great time for photographers & keen birders
  • Rates at camps & beach lodges fall, as do visitor numbers

Our view

A good time to visit, with pros & cons

Weather in December

Country guide

A guide to visiting Malawi

Whether you’re planning a safari, or a hiking trip, or to spend time by the lake, holidays in Malawi tend to be very relaxed. The small, tropical country is, as yet, relatively undiscovered by tourism and the people are famously friendly.

The physical and spiritual backbone of the country is Lake Malawi, whose sandy shoreline is perfect for beach lovers. Few snorkellers can resist the clear, mineral-rich waters teeming with brightly coloured cichlids, while kayakers are drawn to exploring the islands.

Malawi’s wildlife areas are similarly low key – from the slow-moving Shire River that defines Liwonde National Park to the small yet thriving Majete, complete with the “big five”. This is truly a country of land and lake safaris.


Where to go on a Malawi safari holiday

Where to go on a Malawi safari holiday

Malawi’s most established safari destination is Liwonde National Park, a lush, tropical park that lines the Shire River. Crocodiles and hippos patrol this languid waterway, elephant roam the banks, and more than 400 bird species have been recorded.

For a more traditional safari, look no further than Majete Wildlife Reserve, a conservation success story where both driving and walking safaris can take you in search of the “big five”.

Wild, remote and rugged, Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has seen a wildlife transformation in recent years, dominated by elephant and buffalo, and appealing especially to adventurous travellers.

Nyika National Park, too, is popular with hikers and birders, a refreshing haven after a hot safari, yet still with herds of antelope and zebra – and leopard hidden in the hills.

Malawi safari lodges and beach retreats

Malawi’s safari and beach lodges reflect the country as a whole – small, individual and very welcoming.

In Liwonde, a scattering of lodges for different budgets line the Shire River, with lovely views through the trees and the chance to take part in boat, walking and driving safaris. Walking and game drives are also offered from Mkulumadzi, a luxury yet eco-friendly lodge overlooking the Mkulumadzi River, in Majete Wildlife Reserve.

Around the shores of Lake Malawi, and on a couple of the islands, the focus switches to watersports and cultural excursions. Most lodges here are ideally suited to families, from simple and affordable beach lodges to larger (but not very large!) resorts, as well as the upmarket Pumulani, run by the renowned Robin Pope Safaris. There’s even a dedicated kayaking lodge that’s a 2-3 hour paddle from the mainland.

Offshore, on a corner of Likoma Island, you’ll find the chic lakeside bungalows of Kaya Mawa and its equally-smart sibling, Ndomo Point House, which is perhaps Malawi’s best private beach retreat for larger families.

Malawi’s food and culture

Cultural experiences are everywhere in Malawi; travellers can't help but interact with lots of Malawians during a holiday here.

Passing through villages, or browsing at local markets is always a good start, with crafts and textiles sometimes jostling for position among the foodstalls.

Do also try the local cuisine. Nsima, or white maize – served with vegetables, fish or meat – is a staple, while specialities include chambo (tilapia fish, fresh from Lake Malawi), nthochi (banana bread) and mbatata (cookies made from sweet potato and cinnamon).

Entirely unexpected is Likoma Island on Lake Malawi, largely inhabited by fishermen, but whose imposing cathedral is complete with carved soapstone and stained-glass windows. You’ll also find a gem of a small holiday hideaway here: Kaya Mawa, which is deeply involved with the local community.

Malawi in context: history, environment and people

Dominated by Lake Malawi, which is in part a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Malawi is a rich mix of landscapes, from highlands and plateaux to valleys and fertile farmlands.

The early inhabitants of this region date back to the Stone Age, but the arrival of Bantu-speaking peoples around the 10th century and the founding of the Maravi Empire marked a new stage.

Despite the arrival of the Portuguese in the 16th century, it wasn’t until the 1800s that European influence was significant. Establishment of a British protectorate in 1891, later named Nyasaland, led to the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland. Resistance against colonial rule was strong, led by Dr Hastings Kamuzu Banda, who became prime minister on independence in 1964.

Malawi’s population is made up of 11 different ethnic groups, each with its own set of cultural norms and practices. The largest is the Chewa tribe, whose mother tongue, Chichewa, is the official spoken language of Malawi.

Maps of Malawi: two styles

A quick glance at a map makes it clear that Malawi’s shape is defined by Lake Malawi. Fringing the eastern side of the country it occupies the valley floor of the Great Rift Valley, its steep sides creating a dramatic yet fertile landscape.

This natural diversity is thrown into relief with our different styles of mapping. Switch on “terrain” imagery and the country’s highlands stand out; zoom into the areas and you’ll gain a vivid indication of the country’s topography – with its wildlife reserves and safari lodges.

Click onto any of the markers, and follow the links in the bubbles until you find maps of these areas, with precise locations for the various safari camps and lodges.


Reference map
Inspire me

Need inspiration?

Let our trip chooser narrow down the options for you

Inspire me

Understand more about Malawi

Having an understanding of the practical details when planning a holiday can help to make everything run smoothly, and travelling to Malawi is no exception.

Even with our team of specialists behind you, it helps to understand a little of what to expect. Whether you’d like to know more about flights to Malawi, or to read about Malawi’s attitude to LGBT travellers, we can help.

You’ll also find a quick fact-check on things such as currency and language, along with our straightforward advice on the subject of tipping.


Flights to Malawi
Flights to Malawi

Flights to Malawi

We can arrange flights for those taking a holiday to Malawi from the UK, but if you’d prefer to organise them yourself, we will gladly work your itinerary around them.

From London, the easiest and most direct way to reach Malawi is to fly to Johannesburg, often with British Airways, and then to connect through to one of Malawi’s two “gateway” airports, Lilongwe or Blantyre, with Airlink.

Alternatively you can fly into either of these two airports via Addis Ababa with Ethiopian Airlines.

From the USA, you can either fly to London, then we will organise your connecting flights to Malawi – as above – or you can book direct to Malawi, leaving us to arrange any internal flights within the country.

Flights to Malawi

Malawi general information

As with all countries, we advise our travellers to check the latest advice from their government and health specialist before setting off.

Several vaccines, including typhoid, polio and tetanus, are usually sensible for Malawi, and it’s also worth considering yellow fever. Malaria is common, and in some areas of the lake, bilharzia is prevalent. Always check the latest recommendations with your GP or travel clinic.

Although English is one of the official languages, and is widely spoken, the country’s second official language is Chichewa. Even learning the odd word or two will be appreciated.

Malawi is two hours ahead of GMT, with no time difference between the winter and summer months. The local currency is the Malawian kwacha (MWK), but credit cards are increasingly accepted in lodges.

Malawi general information

Advice for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Travellers in Malawi

We've been organising trips to Malawi for our travellers since about 1998 and in that time we’ve booked many trips for gay travellers. We have never heard of any issues experienced by our travellers due to their sexuality.

In more general terms, there remain some laws in Malawi against homosexuality, although these are rarely enforced and we aren’t aware of them ever having been applied to tourists on holiday in Malawi.

As a visitor, your sexual preferences and gender identity are, of course, your private business. If you don’t identify as a heterosexual person, that should not be of any interest to anybody. It is only if your behaviour is deemed unacceptable that you might face reproach – and that would also apply to heterosexual couples behaving inappropriately.

Advice for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Travellers in Malawi

Tipping in Malawi

In Malawi, as in most countries around the world, tipping in Malawi is completely voluntary and should be dependent on the quality of the service you have received.

Most visitors would think of tipping guides, trackers and waiters individually, but consider also those behind the scenes – the chefs, the cleaners, the maintenance staff. Many lodges have a general tip box, with proceeds split equally between this team.

Although tips can make a large difference to those in the service industry, there’s a fine line between the right amount to tip and tipping too much. So while we at Expert Africa believe that good service should be rewarded, please do be mindful of the potential impact on the community, since excessive tips can upset the balance of the local economy.

Tipping in Malawi

Ideas for holidays in Malawi

For some travellers, a trip to Africa – and Malawi is no exception – is all about the thrill of safari. For others Malawi offers the chance of pure relaxation in a beautiful beach-side setting with gentle waves lapping the sands. Some are travelling solo, others in small family groups, still others may be embarking on that adventurous trip of a lifetime.

Malawi can fill all of these dreams – and more. From luxurious island hideaways in Lake Malawi to impressive safari lodges with top-notch guiding in Liwonde and Majete; rugged hiking trips on the Nyika Plateau to full-on kayak adventures – there are a lot of options.

With so much to offer, we have put together a selection of holiday suggestions, below. All our trips are tailormade, so take a look through these ideas, then give us a call and let one of our Malawi experts help to design the right trip for you.


Showing 1-4 of 4
Name
Duration
Cost
Most popular
Itinerary image

Hyena Safari

11 days • 4 locations
VICTORIA FALLS AIRPORT TO LILONGWE AIRPORT

Mix relaxation and adventure on a safari combining the South Luangwa with Victoria Falls and the beaches of Lake Malawi. These three locations are among the most iconic in southern Africa.

US$8,630 - US$11,910 per person

Itinerary image

Red Zebra Cichlid Safari

7 days • 2 locations
BLANTYRE AIRPORT TO LILONGWE AIRPORT

Explore two of Malawi's highlights, with a safari in rugged, remote Majete Wildlife Reserve before some beach time: relaxing, snorkelling and sailing in Lake Malawi National Park.

US$3,400 - US$4,500 per person

Itinerary image

Peacock Cichlid Safari

4 days • 1 locations
LILONGWE AIRPORT TO LILONGWE AIRPORT

Snorkel in Lake Malawi’s famously clear fresh water, relax on the beach and explore Likoma Island from the award-winning Kaya Mawa. A chilled luxury add-on to end your safari.

US$3,430 - US$4,480 per person

Itinerary image

Utaka Cichlid Safari

10 days • 3 locations
BLANTYRE AIRPORT TO LILONGWE AIRPORT

Explore two of Malawi's safari parks - Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park - before finishing your trip with some beach time: relaxing, snorkelling and sailing in Lake Malawi National Park.

US$4,340 - US$5,700 per person

Showing 1-4 of 4

Let us help you customise your trip

All of our holidays on this site are just ideas; none are fixed. All of our trips are tailor-made, so we'll always adapt them to suit you. Talk to an Expert and let us help you to work out your perfect trip.


Talk to an Expert

Call us now! We’ll match you with the Specialist in our team who is best suited to help you. Then together we can start planning your trip.

Set up your itinerary

Based on our experience and your ideas, your specialist will create a detailed, costed itinerary. We’ll refine it together, until we have a trip that you’re perfectly happy with.

Prepare for your trip

The same Specialist will make the seamless arrangements for your trip, send you detailed travel documents, and be available to answer any questions before you depart.

Travel with peace of mind

After you set off, you’ll be cared for by our partners in Africa, most of whom have worked with Expert Africa for decades. And if you ever need us urgently, we’re available 24/7.

When you return

We love to learn about your trip, and so will always be grateful if you’ve the time to give feedback to your Specialist when you return.

Where to stay in Malawi

Ask us for more details of what’s where, and what’s likely to suit you best!


Mkulumadzi Lodge

Mkulumadzi

Mkulumadzi is a class act in a superb location. Come for comfort, a rugged reserve, interesting antelope species, great guiding and a real feeling of getting away from it all.


93% (29 reviews)
Pumulani

Pumulani

Beside the lakeshore, Pumulani is a smart, beach retreat. It's owned by Robin Pope Safaris, from Zambia, and perfect for a few relaxing nights after a safari.


92% (29 reviews)
Kaya Mawa

Kaya Mawa

Kaya Mawa Lodge on Lake Malawi's Likoma Island is Ideal for diving, snorkeling or just relaxing.


96% (27 reviews)
Mvuu Wilderness Lodge

Mvuu Lodge

Mvuu Lodge is a very comfortable lodge on the Shire River in the Liwonde National Park, offering boat, walking and driving safaris.


100% (11 reviews)
Mumbo Island

Mumbo Island

Mumbo Island Camp is a small eco camp on a small granite island in Lake Malawi. This is a great, remote spot for kayaking and snorkeling.


98% (10 reviews)
Tongole Wilderness Lodge

Tongole Wilderness Lodge

Tongole Wilderness Lodge is a relatively new luxury lodge in the Nkhotakota Wilderness Reserve offering walking, fishing and canoeing safaris in a pristine wilderness environment.


90% (10 reviews)
Latitude 13

Latitude 13

Latitude 13 is a very cutting edge modern guest house located in the leafy suburbs of Lilongwe.


71% (9 reviews)
Chintheche Inn

Chintheche Inn

A warm, welcoming beach lodge on the western shore of Lake Malawi, Chintheche Inn offers simple but comfortable accommodation, and a wide range of activities, from watersports to cultural excursions.


86% (7 reviews)
Kuthengo Camp

Kuthengo Camp

Kuthengo Camp is a small, relatively new bushcamp on a bend of the Shire River, under shady fever trees and baobabs. It's a quality operation run by a professional team with a good track record, so is already a reliably good option in Liwonde.


91% (7 reviews)
Ryalls Hotel

Ryalls Hotel

In Blantyre, the capital of Malawi's Southern Region, the Protea Hotel Ryalls is a decent place to stay and can be useful for overnight stops.


87% (6 reviews)
Mvuu Camp

Mvuu Camp

Mvuu Camp is a comfortable family-friendly camp on the banks of the Shire River. If offers boat, walking and driving safaris.


90% (6 reviews)
Makokola Retreat

Makokola Retreat

Makokola Retreat is a large, family friendly lodge located on a stunning beach on the southern lakeshore of Lake Malawi.


97% (6 reviews)
Ku Chawe Inn

Ku Chawe Inn

Zomba Plateau in Malawi


75% (4 reviews)
Chelinda Lodge

Chelinda Lodge

Chelinda Lodge is located on a hillside with views of the rolling grasslands of the remote Nyika Plateau.


100% (3 reviews)
Heuglins Guest House

Heuglins Guest House

Heuglins Guest House, located in the northern suburbs of Malawi's capital Lilongwe, is ideal for overnight stops, and offers the possibility to visit Lilongwe's bustling old town market.


80% (2 reviews)
Domwe Island

Domwe Island

Kayak Africa's Domwe Island in Lake Malawi


80% (1 review)
Makuzi Beach

Makuzi Beach

Makuzi Beach Lodge is situated on the northern shores of Lake Malawi and has one of the very few private beaches in Malawi


100% (1 review)
Blue Zebra Island Lodge

Blue Zebra

Blue Zebra is a simple and affordable beach lodge with lots of character, which is popular with expats and ever increasingly with international visitors.


100% (1 review)
Ndomo Point House

Ndomo Point House

Ndomo Point House is a private house on Likoma Island with its own pool and chef.


No reviews yet
Chelinda Camp

Chelinda Camp

Safaris and travel to Chelinda Camp, on Malawi's Nyika Plateau


No reviews yet

Special types of holiday to Malawi

A holiday in Malawi is as much about how you travel and your interests as about the country itself. Families are drawn by the variety, culture vultures by the people and history; some come seeking solitude; others a beach lodge or a luxury safari - or both.

Watersports feature high on the list, from snorkelling and diving to kayaking and sailing. Wildlife holidays share top billing in Majete and Liwonde, with superb birding in the mix too.

For photographers, stunning lakeside scenery backed by high, verdant mountains vie with underwater shooting in clear lake waters – and of course wildlife close ups on safari.

Up in the mountains, hiking comes into its own, from short walks to challenging treks, and horseriding adds a further dimension.

Take a look at the options, then talk to us and we’ll help to create a holiday in Malawi designed to suit you.


Beach holidays

Beach holidays

Discover Africa's coast and tropical islands.

Birdwatching

Birdwatching

Diverse habitats, discreet hides and superb guiding.

Cultural experiences

Cultural experiences

Get an insight into Africa's cultures and history.

Diving & snorkelling

Diving & snorkelling

Find captivating marine life beneath the waves

Luxury

Luxury

First-class service, scenic vistas and unparalleled comfort await you during these carefully selected luxury holidays. 

Private villas & houses

Private villas & houses

Enjoy Africa with just your friends & family

Riding holidays

Riding holidays

Explore Africa's wilderness on horseback.

Walking

Walking

Explore Africa's most scenic trails on foot.

Wildlife safaris

Wildlife safaris

These trips include hard-hitting game and fascinatingly elusive species alike, as well as superb guiding and a variety of diverse ecosystems.

Frequently Asked Questions

Malawi FAQs

How often have you thought of a travel question that feels too trivial to ask? Most people feel like that sometimes, yet such questions are important.

Below we’ve included some of those that we’re frequently asked – from where you can see the “big five” in Malawi, to what exactly are cichlids.

No matter how small your question may seem, please don’t hesitate to contact us. Our experts have years of experience travelling in Africa – and we’re here to help.


Where can you see the “big five” in Malawi?

Where can you see the “big five” in Malawi?

The “big five”: elephant, lion, buffalo, leopard and rhinoceros. It’s a heady combination of animals – and all can be seen in Malawi.

Following extensive regeneration since 2003, Majete Wildlife Reserve once again boasts all five of these iconic animals, having been sorely neglected in previous years. Its 700km² of fairly rugged land now protect not just the “big five” but also giraffe, cheetah, zebra and of course plenty of antelope. Hippo and crocodiles, too, are in their element in the fast-flowing Shire River as it flows alongside the park.

That same river defines the smaller Liwonde National Park, but here its waters – equally attractive to hippo and crocodiles – flow more slowly, lined by palm trees and imbuing a lush, tropical feel. Elephant and buffalo are commonly sighted in the park, though leopard – while present – are more elusive. Lion, wild dog, black rhino and cheetah have all been reintroduced since 2015.

How much is a safari in Malawi?

As with any holiday, the cost of a safari in Malawi will depend on many variables. Among these are the time you’d like to spend in the country, the activities you’d like to do on safari, and whether or not you’d like to combine a safari with a visit to Lake Malawi or into the mountains.

Costs depend on the time of year you’re travelling, where you’re travelling, how you’re travelling, and your choice of accommodation. Take a look at our suggested holidays in Malawi, then get in touch with us and one of our Malawi experts will help you to create an itinerary around your budget.

Why is Malawi particularly good for a family holiday?

Variety is key to almost all family holidays in Malawi, and in this Malawi the country excels. It’s also famously friendly, often dubbed “the warm heart of Africa”.

Diversity runs through the landscape, from rolling hills and highlands to lush forests and fascinating national parks, and on to the beautiful beaches of Lake Malawi.

Activities around the lake make it a superb family destination, from swimming and snorkelling to kayaking and sailing. With countless colourful fish, there’s plenty to see beneath the waves, while small islands dotting the lake are excellent for exploration.

Combine this with a wildlife safari, typically to Majete Wildlife Reserve or Liwonde National Park, where low visitor numbers allow a more intimate family experience than in many other countries.

Whether your family wants to run along a sandy beach, or play in the waves, or explore local markets, or hike in the mountains, Malawi comes up trumps.

What exactly are cichlids?

Cichlids are a diverse group of freshwater fish belonging to the family Cichlidae. Known for their wide variety of colours, sizes and habitat preferences, they include many species that will be familiar to aquarium enthusiasts.

Indeed, the clear waters of Lake Malawi, covering an area of 30,000km², can seem like a vast aquarium. More than 800 species of cichlid inhabit these waters, many of them endemic - and many at risk of extinction.

They range in size from 2.5cm to 90cm, and exhibit a wide variety of behavioural traits - from complex breeding rituals to advanced forms of parental care. Many are also aggressive, especially during the breeding season or when defending their territory.

The diet of cichlids is equally diverse, with herbivores, carnivores and omnivores all featured within their ranks. It’s an adaptability that makes them particularly interesting for scientific research, offering valuable insights into the processes of natural selection and adaptation.

What's it like to swim in Lake Malawi?

Genuinely warm, clear waters teeming with fish make swimming in Lake Malawi akin to swimming in a giant aquarium – at 29,600km2, the lake is the ninth largest in the world. The feel is that of a calm sea, especially as you can’t always see the other side, yet despite the soft sandy beaches and secluded coves, the water is fresh rather than salty.

When swimming anywhere in Africa (and Lake Malawi is no exception) it’s wise to take informed local advice about the dangers – which could come from larger animals like hippos and crocodiles or from unseen hazards like bilharzia.

Sticking to well-known swimming locations – checked with well-informed local experts – is the best advice to avoid any problems. Then you can take in your surroundings at leisure, from those myriad fish to distant rolling hills lit up by an African sunset.

Our other African destinations

As specialists in Africa, we are well-placed to help you choose the right country for your African adventure.

While Malawi offers plenty of variety, those in search of a more focused safari experience might like to consider neighbouring Zambia, whose South Luangwa National Park can also work well for a top-notch safari in combination with a Malawi holiday.

Zimbabwe, too, offers high standards of wildlife guiding and – like Zambia – has the added bonus of the Victoria Falls.

For something a little less “wild”, take a look at Kenya or Tanzania, whereas for a self-drive holiday, Namibia is a must.

Entirely different is Rwanda, where visiting a family of mountain gorillas is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

Like Malawi, several other countries – Kenya, Mozambique and South Africa - present the combined appeal of safari and beaches, or how about an idyllic island add-on to Zanzibar or even the Seychelles?

The choices are many and varied, so do contact us; we’re here to help you plan your perfect African holiday.


Botswana

Botswana

With big game, glamorous lodges and one of the greatest unspoilt wildernesses on Earth, Botswana is perhaps Africa's most exclusive safari destination.

Read more about Botswana
Kenya

Kenya

Humanity’s ancestors lived in Kenya, which is now home to people speaking 42 languages, and some of Africa’s rarest, most magnificent wildlife.

Read more about Kenya
Mozambique

Mozambique

An ocean paradise protected by world-class marine parks, Mozambique’s idyllic archipelagos offer heavenly hideaways, outstanding diving and laid-back luxury.

Read more about Mozambique
Namibia

Namibia

Spectacular scenery, diverse wildlife and a rich cultural heritage await discovery by air, with a guide or on a self-drive adventure.

Read more about Namibia
Rwanda

Rwanda

This small, mountainous country offers Africa’s best gorilla treks, other good safari options and a profound human element in every trip.

Read more about Rwanda
Seychelles

Seychelles

The ultimate glamorous getaway: the lush islands of Seychelles are enchantingly beautiful and stylish sanctuaries for both wildlife and ocean-lovers.

Read more about Seychelles
South Africa

South Africa

Cosmopolitan Cape Town, world-class wineries, brilliant ‘Big Five’ safaris and spectacularly diverse scenery make South African holidays fabulously exciting and enjoyable.

Read more about South Africa
Tanzania

Tanzania

East Africa’s biggest country has a wide range of parks to explore and some of the Indian Ocean’s best island retreats.

Read more about Tanzania
Zambia

Zambia

Home to walking safaris, exceptional wildlife, superb guiding and the mighty Victoria Falls, Zambia is Africa at its most alluring.

Read more about Zambia
Zanzibar

Zanzibar

The ultimate Spice Island: Zanzibar’s mystique, marine life and chic beach retreats make it Africa’s most alluring archipelago.

Read more about Zanzibar
Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe

Stunning national parks teeming with game, plus Africa's finest professional guides and the spectacular Victoria Falls: Zimbabwe is enthralling.

Read more about Zimbabwe

Elephant safari
in Linyanti

Login to Expert Africa

Sign in with password

Sign in with email link


New to Expert Africa? Create an account

Forgotten your details?

It's free & quick to set up

  • Save your wish-list
  • Send us an enquiry
  • Pay online for your trip
  • Subscribe to our newsletter
  • Give us feedback on your trip
  • Full site benefits of the site

Need some help? Talk to our team

Africa