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Namibia
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Namibia

Immerse yourself in spectacular scenery

Soar over the world's oldest desert in a hot air balloon

Namibia is home to world's largest cheetah population

Enjoy a bird's eye view of Namibia's vastness

Escape to the Skeleton Coast

Etosha is full of photographic opportunities

Find solitude beside the Kunene River

Etosha has a healthy lion population

Enjoy excellent for hiking, both guided & self-guided

Track desert-adapted elephants in damaraland

Enjoy a front row seat to the wildlife action

Visit colonies of Cape fur seals along the Namibian coast.

Namibia

Namibia holidays

Captivating in scale, natural grandeur and sheer emptiness, Namibia is by turns breathtakingly beautiful and almost dauntingly wild.

Namibia

Add to this a plethora of hospitable lodges, exceptionally good roads and many superb areas for wildlife safaris, and the country becomes perfect for individual exploration – by light aircraft, guided expedition or self-drive.

To focus on the highlights of a Namibia holiday is to take in the soaring red dunes of Sossusvlei, the rich colonial culture of the coastal towns coastal towns, and the wildlife in Etosha National Park: mountains, sea and safari in one iconic trip.

But spread your wings further, and the options are even more tantalising. With a fifth of this huge country protected by national parks, and much more safeguarded in superb private reserves, there is no shortage of mountains to hike, of wildlife to seek out, of sheer space in which to safari.

This extraordinary diversity of landscape protects the people of some of Namibia’s most ancient cultures, from the semi-nomadic Himba whose villages are scattered among the vast rocky plains of the north-west to the San, or Bushmen, who have for millennia hunted on the open plains of the Kalahari .

It’s a heady mix, one that repays exploration in many different ways – and for a range of budgets. Whether you’re looking for a self-drive trip including some nights beneath the stars, the luxury of a fly-in safari staying in top-class lodges, or something in between, Namibia is the place to create your own adventure.

Namibia's key areas and destinations

Towering red dunes unfolding in waves towards the distant ocean – this is the iconic image of Namibia, this is Sossusvlei in the Namib-Naukluft National Park.

But Namibia has other “must-sees”. For prolific wildlife, the vast salt pan and numerous waterholes of Etosha National Park draw elephants and giraffes, lions and black rhinos, and more. This is world-class safari destination.

Desert-adapted elephants roam the ephemeral rivers of Damaraland, where indigenous San people created unique galleries of rock art; further north, the pastoral Himba cling on to their semi-nomadic culture.

Battered by the cold waters of the Atlantic the hostile Skeleton Coast is home to thousands of Cape fur seals – and the rare brown hyena.

Look into the depths of the Fish River Canyon and wonder at the layers of history in the rocks beneath your feet, or seek out the erstwhile Caprivi Strip for prolific birdlife, lush scenery – and hippos. And if you’re craving contemporary culture, head for the coastal towns.


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Etosha

31 places to stay

Namibia’s flagship national park is a must for wildlife lovers and photographers, whether self-driving or on a guided game drive.

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Damaraland

26 places to stay

From rock art to rhinos, Damaraland’s treasures are intrinsically bound up with a landscape of rugged mountains and wide, grassy plains.

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Namib-Naukluft

25 places to stay

A captivating landscape of soft sculpted dunes, vast plains and majestic mountains with excellent hiking: few can resist the Namib-Naukluft.

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Caprivi Strip

23 places to stay

Literally out on a limb from the rest of Namibia, the Caprivi has an entirely different feel: lush, verdant and often rich in wildlife.

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Windhoek

21 places to stay

An inevitable stopover for most visitors, Windhoek, with its attractive valley setting, is worth more than a passing glance.

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Swakop' & Walvis Bay

23 places to stay

From shopping to sandboarding, seafood to coffee and cake, boat trips to birdwatching: the seaside towns offer a varied take on Namibia.

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Southern Namibia

15 places to stay

Low, deep-red, undulating dunes characterise the southern Kalahari, variously home to photogenic quivertrees, carpets of flowers and the irresistible meerkat.

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Central Highlands

9 places to stay

Small, personal lodges and guest farms welcome visitors to these rolling hills, whose attractions range from hiking to cave paintings.

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Skeleton Coast

13 places to stay

Fringing Namibia’s western border with the Atlantic, the Skeleton Coast is one of the world’s most desolate yet compelling wildernesses.

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Fish River Canyon

7 places to stay

Both awe-inspiring and exceptionally picturesque, the Fish River Canyon follows a deep fissure in the arid landscape of southern Namibia.

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Lüderitz & Aus

5 places to stay

Marooned at the end of a long road from Aus, Lüderitz retains the feel of a frontier town founded on the 20th-century diamond boom.

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NamibRand

7 places to stay

With just a scattering of lodges across a desert area nearly three times the size of Singapore, the NamibRand offers pure escapism.

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Okonjima

4 places to stay

Renowned for its leopard sightings, Okonjima protects and conserves a range of big cats on a private reserve between Windhoek and Etosha.

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Waterberg Plateau

3 places to stay

Renowned for some of the best walking in Namibia, Waterberg is one of the country’s smallest, yet most intriguing national parks.

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Bushmanland

1 places to stay

Remote and seemingly endless, the Kalahari sand-sheet that covers north-eastern Namibia offers a remarkable opportunity to immerse yourself in Bushman culture.

Ten best safari holidays to Namibia

All our trips to Namibia are tailor-made, based around how you wish to travel, but here are ten of the most popular options – out of the 23 Namibia safari holidays on this website.

Most Namibia holidays are self-drive trips. This isn’t intrepid exploration; we’ll plan the trip with you and arrange a car, detailed maps and all the information that you’ll need to explore at your own pace. Look for trips named self-drive safaris below.

A fly-in safari is great for those with limited time, or who don’t want to drive, giving a magical perspective on the country’s dramatic landscapes. Look for trips named fly-in safaris below.

If you don’t want to drive yourself, consider on of our guided safaris below. On these you’ll be driven around the country, gleaning real insights from your private guide along the way. These fascinating and very flexible trips can be as wild as you want – talk to us about designing one just for you.

Below are examples of some great Namibia holidays; contact us to help you plan your own.


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Chongololo Self-drive Safari

21 days • 11 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

This self-drive safari focuses on the best walking experiences in Namibia. Get your boots ready for the apricot dunes of the Namib Desert and the ancient hills of Damaraland.

US$5,750 - US$7,150 per person

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Hartebeest Self-drive Safari

16 days • 8 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

This self-drive safari focuses on the best cultural experiences in Namibia. Visit a Himba village and enjoy three days living with the San Bushmen interspersed with some excellent wildlife watching.

US$3,360 - US$4,120 per person

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Rock Hare Self-drive Safari

20 days • 12 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO VICTORIA FALLS AIRPORT

An in-depth look at Namibia from the Namib Desert to the Caprivi, with additional stops in Botswana and Victoria Falls. This three-week adventure includes an unrivalled mix of environments and is great value.

US$5,060 - US$7,210 per person

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Caracal Self-drive Safari

14 days • 8 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

The quintessential Namibian self-drive adventure exploring the highlights from Sossusvlei and the Namib Desert to Damaraland’s wilderness and a safari in Etosha. A great mix of accommodation and excellent value.

US$2,280 - US$3,860 per person

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Dune Lark Fly & Drive Safari

14 days • 8 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

A combination fly-in self-drive exploration of Namibia, with quick, easy and scenic flights in and out of Sossusvlei before a classic road trip adventure of the country’s rugged north.

US$4,330 - US$5,560 per person

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Brown Hyena Self-drive

14 days • 8 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

The perfect trip for those who want to mix the adventure and freedom of a self-drive with some of our favourite luxury camps in Namibia and a great mix of activities.

US$5,900 - US$7,550 per person

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Quiver Tree Self-drive Safari

14 days • 7 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

An offbeat Namibian self-drive adventure exploring the epic Fish River Canyon and fascinating Kolmanskop ghost town in the south, before turning north via the classic highlights of Sossusvlei, Swakopmund and Damaraland.

US$2,270 - US$3,130 per person

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Black Wildebeest Self-drive Safari

19 days • 10 locations
CAPE TOWN AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

Journey from South Africa’s cosmopolitan Cape Town to central Namibia’s Okonjima Nature Reserve during this self-driven safari. The route passes through a stunning variety of landscapes, offering access to this beautiful continent’s rich diversity.

US$3,150 - US$3,620 per person

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Cape Fox Guided Safari

13 days • 7 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

A classic clockwise circuit around Namibia’s northern highlights with a private guide and vehicle. We can’t think of a better way to see more in this timeframe.

US$7,620 - US$9,240 per person

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Black-faced Impala Guided Safari

13 days • 6 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

A unique mix of luxury and adventure in our original, and perhaps most varied, destination on a privately guided Namibian overland safari. Perfect for families, friends or couples travelling together.

US$6,790 - US$8,880 per person

Our travellers' 10 most recent Namibia holidays reviews

At Expert Africa, the feedback we receive from our travellers is invaluable.

It helps us to stay up to date with the latest developments, which in turn helps our travellers to plan their trips; it even helps us to understand our travellers better. It’s also very important to our partners running lodges and safari camps across Namibia, who appreciate such genuine and constructive feedback.

All our Namibia holiday reviews are published in full without us editing them. See all 1608 reviews of Namibia safaris holidays here, or click on a card below to read one of the most recent reviews in full.


99%
1608 reviews since August 2007
Excellent
1547
Good
54
Average
5
Poor
2
Terrible
0
Mr Antony from Auckland

Arrived 29 Sep 2022, 22 nights

"My Sep 2022 trip"

"As 'Expert' Africa you absolutely live up to that title...exemplary service …" Read Mr Antony’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

Mr and Mrs G from Bucks

Arrived 15 Dec 2023, 23 nights

"My Dec 2023 trip"

"Fantastic trip; unique experiences and was cleverly designed... …" Read Mr and Mrs G’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

Ms R from N. Yorkshire

Arrived 13 Jan 2024, 13 nights

"My Jan 2024 trip"

"Fantastic trip. Well-organised - we really appreciated the level of information …" Read Ms R’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

John from Western Canada

Arrived 11 Dec 2023, 13 nights

"My Dec 2023 trip"

"Really happy with this trip! Maruska did a great job...we would do it all again …" Read John’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

Jane U from London

Arrived 11 Nov 2023, 35 nights

"My Nov 2023 trip"

"I loved my trip. It really was the journey of a lifetime. …" Read Jane U’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

Mrs & Mrs A from London

Arrived 23 Nov 2023, 13 nights

"My Nov 2023 trip"

"We had an absolutely wonderful trip - would thoroughly recommend Expert Africa. …" Read Mrs & Mrs A’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

Mr N from United Kingdom

Arrived 7 Nov 2023, 13 nights

"My Nov 2023 trip"

"The trip as a whole was very nice - only problem was having a bat in our room .. …" Read Mr N’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Good

Mr and Mrs M from Scotland

Arrived 12 Nov 2023, 25 nights

"My Nov 2023 trip"

Overall rating: Excellent

JD from Harrogate

Arrived 3 Nov 2023, 19 nights

"Namibia November 2023"

"This was an amazing trip and covered areas of Namibia we had not been to before …" Read JD’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

Mr & Mrs Paul from Surrey

Arrived 16 Oct 2023, 19 nights

"October Honeymoon 2023"

"trip was really great, each element was different...all were really high quality …" Read Mr & Mrs Paul’s full holiday review

Overall rating: Excellent

See all Namibia reviews

Our travellers' wildlife sightings across Namibia

While they are in Namibia, many of our travellers record their wildlife sightings for us – from big cats and elephants to black rhino and brown hyena – and kindly share these with us when they are home. Citizen science in action!

Their feedback gives us a unique picture of the distribution of various species, so we in turn can tell other travellers their best chances spotting individual species during a Namibian safari. (Read how this wildlife survey works.) The percentages below give just an “average” percentage of the likelihood of a safari visitor seeing each species in Namibia.

For full details of sightings at individual camps and lodges, our species-by-species interactive map shows the best locations for wildlife viewing in Namibia.


Hippo

83% success

Elephant

81% success

Oryx

81% success

Buffalo

70% success

Giraffe

69% success

Zebra

68% success

Wildebeest

56% success

Lion

52% success

Black Rhino

50% success

White Rhino

48% success

Eland

47% success

Sable antelope

22% success

Sitatunga

22% success

Roan antelope

20% success

Leopard

18% success

Spotted Hyena

17% success

Brown Hyena

17% success

Cheetah

16% success

Meerkat

13% success

Wild dog

8% success

Pangolin

3% success

Aardvark

2% success

Where to find Namibia’s key wildlife species

Our travellers’ feedback on their wildlife sightings helps us to work out the best camps and lodges to see Namibia’s key wildlife species.

Whether you’re driven by spotting a cheetah in Namibia in Namibia, or your must-see animal is a desert-adapted elephant, we can help. Take a look at our data-driven maps, which show the best places to actually see each species within Namibia’s extraordinary diverse range of habitats.

For a specific data-driven map of the best camps and lodges for sightings of a particular species, click on a card:


Oryx

Oryx

Oryx sp.

Oryx are impressive antelopes, with a powerful physique and elegant markings set off by rapier-like horns. They cut a distinctive dash in some of Africa’s harshest landscapes.

70% SUCCESS

1,270 sightings from 1,815 observations

Where to see oryx in Namibia

Cheetah

Cheetah

Acinonyx jubatus

The cheetah is the fastest land animal and the only cat that hunts by pure speed. Found largely in open grasslands, its slim, elegant form is today an increasingly rare sight.

33% SUCCESS

1,002 sightings from 3,032 observations

Where to see cheetah in Namibia

Black Rhino

Black Rhino

Diceros bicornis

The black rhino is the smaller and rarer of Africa’s two rhino species but has the more fearsome reputation. Shy and heavily persecuted, it tends to stick to cover.

31% SUCCESS

605 sightings from 1,955 observations

Where to see black rhino in Namibia

White Rhino

White Rhino

Ceratotherium simum

The white rhino is the largest and most numerous of the world’s five rhinoceros species. They are larger, easier to see and generally more approachable than the black rhino.

44% SUCCESS

474 sightings from 1,080 observations

Where to see white rhino in Namibia

Elephant

Elephant

Loxodonta africana

By far the biggest of the so-called Big Five – indeed, the largest land animal on the planet – the elephant shapes the very landscape it inhabits and is a defining presence on any safari.

91% SUCCESS

3,493 sightings from 3,837 observations

Where to see elephant in Namibia

Lion

Lion

Panthera leo

Lions are at the top of the food chain and also most safari wish-lists, but with their numbers falling fast, any encounter with these majestic apex predators always feels like a privilege.

81% SUCCESS

2,923 sightings from 3,589 observations

Where to see lion in Namibia

Meerkat

Meerkat

Suricata suricatta

These highly sociable little mammals have an endearing appearance and comical antics. Found in the drier areas of Southern Africa, close encounters are a sought-after experience.

22% SUCCESS

84 sightings from 390 observations

Where to see meerkat in Namibia

Buffalo

Buffalo

Syncerus caffer

One of the ‘Big Five’, buffalo earned a fearsome reputation in hunters’ tales. By contrast, big herds of these sociable bovids are placid, but mount formidable defences against predators.

83% SUCCESS

2,463 sightings from 2,970 observations

Where to see buffalo in Namibia

Giraffe

Giraffe

Giraffa camelopardalis

The world’s tallest land mammal, giraffes are herbivores which have evolved many unique adaptations. Their iconic outlines tower above the bush in many of Africa’s wildlife areas.

86% SUCCESS

3,363 sightings from 3,895 observations

Where to see giraffe in Namibia

Hippo

Hippo

Hippopotamus amphibius

The territorial calls of the hippo create a signature soundtrack to Africa’s rivers & wetlands. Despite an endearing smile, this aquatic herbivore has a notoriously aggressive disposition.

89% SUCCESS

2,552 sightings from 2,863 observations

Where to see hippo in Namibia

Spotted Hyena

Spotted Hyena

Crocuta crocuta

The spotted hyena may be thought of as ‘ugly’ and ‘cowardly’. In fact, this versatile and intelligent carnivore is one of Africa’s most fascinating and warrants attention on any safari.

55% SUCCESS

2,089 sightings from 3,784 observations

Where to see spotted hyena in Namibia

Brown Hyena

Brown Hyena

Parahyaena brunnea

This largely solitary scavenger is one of the more elusive and little-known of Africa’s carnivores. Shaggier than its spotted cousin, it occurs only in the arid southwest of the continent.

17% SUCCESS

239 sightings from 1,442 observations

Where to see brown hyena in Namibia

Leopard

Leopard

Panthera pardus

The most numerous of Africa’s big cats, leopard occur across many habitats, from wild tracts to populated areas. Their grace and their elusive nature make them a unique safari drawcard.

47% SUCCESS

1,867 sightings from 3,968 observations

Where to see leopard in Namibia

Wild dog

Wild dog

Lycaon pictus

African wild dogs are among the continent’s most compelling animals. Much misunderstood, these rare, tie-dyed canids are amazingly efficient hunters with a fascinating social life.

32% SUCCESS

838 sightings from 2,660 observations

Where to see wild dog in Namibia

Wildebeest

Wildebeest

Connochaetes sp.

Superficially bovine in appearance, wildebeests are known for their spectacular migrations sometimes in huge numbers. These resilient animals are some of Africa’s most successful herbivores.

68% SUCCESS

2,372 sightings from 3,511 observations

Where to see wildebeest in Namibia

Pangolin

Pangolin

Smutsia sp.

Pangolins appear to be more pine cone than animal in their unique armoury of scales. These nocturnal, ant-eating oddities are not only highly elusive but also increasingly rare.

2% SUCCESS

52 sightings from 3,186 observations

Where to see pangolin in Namibia

Aardvark

Aardvark

Orycteropus afer

The aardvark is one of Africa’s most bizarre and enigmatic animals. A shy, nocturnal termite-eater, signs of its presence may be scattered about the bush whilst sightings remain elusive.

2% SUCCESS

67 sightings from 3,193 observations

Where to see aardvark in Namibia

Eland

Eland

Taurotragus oryx

Africa’s largest antelope, eland are culturally important from prehistoric rock art to modern game farms. Though widespread, they are also shy so sightings are uncommon and often fleeting.

49% SUCCESS

1,397 sightings from 2,864 observations

Where to see eland in Namibia

Zebra

Zebra

Equus sp.

The zebra is a quintessential African animal: the horse in stripy pyjamas at the end of every child’s A–Z. There are three species, of which the plains zebra is much the most common.

84% SUCCESS

3,670 sightings from 4,349 observations

Where to see zebra in Namibia

Roan antelope

Roan antelope

Hippotragus equinus

Africa’s second largest antelope and one of its most handsome, with a powerful build and distinctive markings, roan are wary of people, but renowned for their bravery against predators.

23% SUCCESS

457 sightings from 1,955 observations

Where to see roan antelope in Namibia

Sable antelope

Sable antelope

Hippotragus niger

Perhaps Africa’s most beautiful antelope, sable are renowned for their combative nature, even holding off lions. Shy and restricted in range, sightings of sable are always special.

22% SUCCESS

436 sightings from 1,951 observations

Where to see sable antelope in Namibia

Sitatunga

Sitatunga

Tragelaphus spekii

The sitatunga is the most aquatic of Africa’s antelopes and specially adapted to its swampy habitats. Though widespread across Africa, only a handful of places offer reliable sightings.

19% SUCCESS

59 sightings from 315 observations

Where to see sitatunga in Namibia

When to go on a Namibia holiday

Key to planning any holiday to Namibia – from an adventurous road trip to a top-notch guided safari – is weather.

The good news is that there’s no “wrong” time to visit Namibia: the climate is generally dry and pleasant. Temperatures are typically warm or hot during the day, although in desert areas between June and August they may fall below freezing at night. Rainfall is fractional along the coastal fringes, whereas further east it tends to fall largely between November and March – often in the form of short, sharp thunderstorms.

For wildlife watching, especially in Etosha, April to October are the best months, when animals are drawn to the park’s perennial water sources. Prices tend to peak in July and August. Conversely, the wetter season is cheaper, less crowded – and an excellent time for birders. Click on the months below; and see here for historic rainfall and temperatures in Namibia.


Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Namibia in January

January is at the heart of Namibia’s rainy season. However, as you’d expect from a country dominated by desert and semi-desert environments, the rains are often (but not always) weak and usually quite localised. Some days will be clear, the strong sun raising temperatures to around 30ºC/86ºF; on others humidity and clouds build, sometimes culminating in spectacular thunderstorms. In extreme cases, these generate flash-floods which race down the beds of ephemeral rivers.

Across the country, the greening landscape makes a refreshing change, especially in desert areas. Many birds are in full breeding plumage and migrant species are here in force. In the north, where the rains are more reliable, the abundant water and food allows wildlife to disperse, making it trickier to spot.

  • Variable weather: clear, hot & dry, or cloudy & humid with some rain
  • Occasional, highly localised thunderstorms
  • Many animals with young; birdlife at its most spectacular
  • Wildlife dispersed & harder to see, especially in Etosha & the Caprivi
  • Very few tourists (apart from the New Year) so rates mostly low

Our view

This is not a great time to visit

Weather in January

Namibia in February

February is the wettest month, but as Namibia is dominated by deserts, the rains are often weak and patchy. The variation in weather across Namibia is significant, too; the central highlands and Caprivi can see some heavy rain. More typically, some February days are clear with a hot, strong sun; others are cooler as cloudy skies build and, sometimes, culminate in short, spectacular thunderstorms. Occasionally these generate flash-floods, bringing ephemeral rivers to life and making travel more challenging.

Across the country, the landscape feels green and alive; insects and smaller animals are more easily seen, and many birds and animals are raising their young. However, small pools in the bush and thicker vegetation can make it hard to spot the wildlife.

  • Variable weather: clear, hot & dry or cloudy & humid with some rain
  • Occasional localised thunderstorms meander over the landscape
  • The bush feels alive; birdlife is at its most spectacular
  • Wildlife in Etosha & Caprivi is dispersed & harder to see
  • Few tourists, so rates usually at their lowest

Our view

This is not a great time to visit

Weather in February

Namibia in March

March usually sees Namibia’s main rains tailing off, although actual precipitation varies hugely across the country and can be unpredictable from day to day. Many days will be clear, with a strong sun driving temperatures up. On others, clouds will build, and the late afternoon may see a short, spectacular thunderstorm. Such deluges reduce in both frequency and volume as the month progresses.

Across the country, landscapes are often vivid: a “green and pleasant land”. Many birds and animals are finishing raising their young, so smaller animals and insects are in evidence. In the north, where rains are generally heavier, pools in the bush and thicker vegetation can make it difficult to spot larger animals.

  • Variable weather: clear, hot & dry or cloudy & humid with some rain
  • Afternoon thunderstorms less common as March progresses
  • Animals looking sleek and well-fed, after 3–4 months of plenty
  • Wildlife in Etosha & Caprivi is dispersed & harder to see
  • Few tourists visit during March, so rates often low

Our view

A good time to visit, with pros & cons

Weather in March

Namibia in April

Typically, April is dominated by dry weather; there’s an ever-decreasing chance of rain. Temperatures are now below their peak and continue to fall. Even so, days remain pleasant and warm, but there might be a slight chill in the air at night. The rains usually leave many parts of the country verdant and green, so animals are in fantastic condition – often with fast-growing young in attendance.

With the dust washed out of the atmosphere, photographers make the most of clear air, spectacular landscapes and healthy animals. Stargazers will have clearer night skies as the month progresses. In the game parks of Northern Namibia, water and food remain in plentiful supply, so finding big game can prove trickier than later in the year.

  • Becoming drier &, especially at night, also cooler
  • Few visitors, except around Easter, so rates remain low
  • Wildlife in Etosha & Caprivi remains relatively hard to see
  • Migrant birds have started to leave
  • Fresh, clean air and often green, verdant landscapes

Our view

A good time to visit, with pros & cons

Weather in April

Namibia in May

By May, Namibia is usually drying out fast as the rains have ended. If they’ve been good, then the land remains green, but wildlife starts to congregate at more permanent water sources. Over much of the country the air quality and clarity can be amazing, making this an ideal month for photography.

Typical days are warm, with crisp, clear mornings and clear blue skies. Evenings are usually cool, and temperatures may dip below 10ºC (50ºF) overnight. Many lodges still charge “low season” prices, although with Namibia’s increasing popularity in recent years, some have started to introduce higher “shoulder season” rates.

May’s good-value rates, increasingly good wildlife sightings, beautiful landscapes and crystal-clear air combine to make this one of our favourite months in Namibia.

  • Lovely weather: dry, warm days & cool nights
  • The country is drying out although many landscapes remain green
  • Fantastic air clarity – ideal for keen photographers
  • Visitor numbers are often still low, mirrored by lodge rates
  • Wildlife is starting to congregate more around remaining water

Our view

A very good time to visit

Weather in May

Namibia in June

Namibia is dry again. Skies are blue and usually largely cloudless. Days are lovely: warm and dry; nights are cold, sometimes below freezing in the desert. Most swimming pools in Namibia are always outdoors, making them too cold for all except the very dedicated.

Take a warm hat and gloves for game drives, where dawn and dusk will feel particularly chilly. In the north, especially Etosha, wildlife viewing is now into its dry-season pattern, focusing around the waterholes – though the park is still not busy.

Photographers come for superb air clarity, with minimal dust or smoke in the air. Historically, June rates have been low. However, with Namibia’s increasing popularity many lodges now count it amongst their “high-season” months, and request higher prices.

  • Clear, bright days with blue skies; cold nights, mornings & evenings
  • Great air quality, especially welcome for photographers
  • “Shoulder season” for some lodges: lodge rates moderate
  • Wildlife gravitates to waterholes, making game-viewing productive
  • Some greenery in the landscape, depending on the last rains

Our view

A very good time to visit

Weather in June

Namibia in July

Reliably warm daytime temperatures (upwards of 20ºC/70ºF) and good wildlife sightings make this a popular month to visit Namibia. Rain would be very unusual indeed and clear skies make for great photographs. Once the sun sets, though, temperatures cool rapidly bringing cold nights that may dip below freezing in the desert. Be prepared: dress in layers and expect early-morning and late-afternoon drives, and anywhere coastal, to be cold.

As the land dries and vegetation shrivels, game congregates beside drinking water: Etosha’s waterholes are busy with animals. Across the country, lodges charge “high season” rates; many are fully booked a year or more in advance, especially during European school holidays (from the latter half of July to late August).

  • Dry days, warm in the sun, with crisp, cold nights
  • Cloudless skies: July is usually superb for stargazing
  • The beginning of European school holidays so more families travelling
  • Peak season: so high rates and many lodges fully booked far in advance
  • A fantastic time of year for wildlife watching, particularly in Etosha

Our view

A very good time to visit

Weather in July

Namibia in August

August is the height of Namibia’s “winter”. Expect cloudless skies and plenty of warm sun in the day, but nights down to freezing in the desert. Dress in layers and bring warm clothes (including hats and gloves) for chilly starts and evenings. Only the hardiest even contemplate using outdoor pools.

It’s 3–4 months since any rain, so the land is dust-dry and much vegetation is golden brown. Many landscapes appear sparse and harsh. Wildlife congregates around available water sources, helping to guarantee good animal sightings.

Namibia is never really “busy” by the standards of Europe or the USA, but August is the most popular time to visit, especially for families. Book early (over a year in advance) if you want to stay at the best lodges.

  • Dry days, warm in the sun; cold mornings, evenings & nights
  • Cloudless skies in the day; spectacular stars at night
  • Busy by Namibian standards: family rooms in particular demand
  • Peak season: so high rates and many lodges fully booked far in advance
  • A fantastic time of year for wildlife watching, particularly in Etosha

Our view

Fantastic: the very best time to visit

Weather in August

Namibia in September

September is a month of blue, cloudless skies and fantastic wildlife viewing. Rain is almost unheard of. As the month progresses, the days and nights get warmer. In some areas, daily maximums hit around the low 30s Celsius, although low humidity ensures this feels comfortable. The contrast makes the nights seem very cold. The air is becoming dustier, occasionally augmented by smoke from fires – so becoming hazy for photographic purists.

In the national parks, animals congregate around remaining water sources – making September one of the best months for game viewing. Hence it’s one of Namibia’s most popular months for visitors: a “high season” month that is often the time of choice for safari aficionados.

  • One of the best months for wildlife viewing
  • Warm days & cold nights, with temperatures rising during the month
  • Many plants have faded from green to golden brown
  • Air can be hazy – with dust & sometimes smoke
  • High season rates; many lodges & camps are full 9 months in advance.

Our view

Fantastic: the very best time to visit

Weather in September

Namibia in October

Namibia is usually at its hottest and driest in October. Temperatures build as the month progresses; towards the end, daily highs may exceed 40ºC/100ºF, though with humidity close to zero, even this rarely feels oppressive.

In exceptional years, isolated rain showers may fall in late October. More usually, the end of the dry season sees wildlife watching at its best, particularly in Etosha. The place feels like a desert as spectacular herds of thirsty animals gather around the available water. October is popular amongst wildlife enthusiasts and commands peak-season prices, even if dust and smoke may make the air hazy, challenging photographers. Visitor numbers can fade towards the end of the month, allowing a window for last-minute bookings.

  • Probably the most spectacular month for wildlife-viewing in Etosha
  • Hot and dry: much of the country feels like a desert
  • The air can be hazy with dust & smoke
  • It’s peak time to visit, so expect high season rates
  • Lodges & camps are full, especially early in October

Our view

A very good time to visit

Weather in October

Namibia in November

November is always a bit unpredictable: sometimes dry and hot; sometimes cloudier and cooler. Typically, mornings are hot and cloudless and clouds appear in the afternoon. Humidity builds and eventually breaks, resulting in spectacular thunderstorms that bring convection rainfall in late afternoons. Such storms are typically sparsely distributed and highly local – being completely absent from desert areas, for example. Places that do get good rain will flush green, with a tangible feeling of new life softening the landscapes. Many mammals give birth to their young.

Once any rains come, wildlife dissipates in search of food, and game viewing in Etosha becomes harder. Conversely, this is a great time for birdwatchers, with migrant species in breeding plumage.

  • A very interesting, variable month, depending on the rains
  • With rains come an amazing explosion of both vegetation & new life
  • Wildlife viewing better in Damaraland than Etosha if it has rained
  • Shoulder season: mid-range rates offer great value
  • Away from the Namib, showers are more likely later in the month

Our view

A good time to visit, with pros & cons

Weather in November

Namibia in December

December is the first “proper” month of Namibia’s rainy season, and one of its hottest. Clear mornings give way to building clouds and, with luck, the occasional short, spectacular thunderstorm: refreshing and cleansing. These are often highly localised and generally warmly welcomed: most Namibians love rain!

Rains clear the air of dust. Even relatively short showers enable plant life to erupt, carpeting this thirstland in green and providing food for the young animals which abound. Animals disperse widely, which can make game viewing challenging. Many birds are breeding and so sporting their most colourful plumage.

Christmas and the New Year fall within local “summer holidays” – so places to stay can be surprisingly busy, especially in and around coastal towns, where temperatures are cooler.

  • Hot and humid; sometimes refreshed by cooling showers
  • Landscapes flushed green if/where there has been rain
  • A tangible life and energy amidst this often green & pleasant land
  • Very photogenic: blooming deserts amidst crystal-clear air
  • Best time for birdwatchers; larger animals harder to spot

Our view

This is not a great time to visit

Weather in December

Country guide

A guide to visiting Namibia

Take a Namibia holiday; this is African travel at its most varied! Flying in, driving yourself, or being guided: the choice is yours.

A classic Namibian holiday might feature sunrise on top of the world's highest dunes; a day relaxing in a hot mineral spring at the foot of the world's second-deepest canyon; a wildlife safari watching lion stalk huge herds of antelope – and an evening observing wild black rhino by moonlight.

You can meet a cheetah at close quarters, stroll through a petrified forest, marvel at ancient rock paintings and see footprints as old as a dinosaur – or as fresh and close as a leopard outside your tent. Namibia is a real travel adventure, like nowhere else on earth.


Where to go in Namibia

Where to go in Namibia

Namibia’s key attractions are relatively undervisited, so even seeking out dense herds of big game in Etosha National Park, or taking in the show-stopping scenery of the Namib-Naukluft National Park, there’s no sense of crowds.

More offbeat is Damaraland, home to black rhino, elephant and other desert-adapted animals. Then there is the vast, coastal wilderness of the Skeleton Coast, or the rugged mountains of semi-desert Kaokoland, and Bushmanland: these are Namibia at its most remote.

If adventure beckons, head for Namibia’s adrenalin capital, Swakopmund, which along with duneboarding also boasts some exceptional desert excursions. Or marvel at the 500m-deep Fish River Canyon, a spectacular backdrop for hiking.

And if you have time to explore further, consider the more verdant Caprivi Strip, or Zambezi Region, where you can combine a classic safari with boat trips on narrow waterways and perhaps add on a visit to Victoria Falls.

How to explore Namibia

Travel in Namibia is very easy – although how you travel is at least as crucial as where you travel.

The options are largely between a self-drive road trip, a fly-in trip, and a privately guided safari – although a mix of two or even all three is certainly possible.

Most popular is to drive yourself, giving you the freedom to travel where you want, at your own pace. With long, straight roads and minimal traffic, Namibia excels at self-drive trips.

A fly-in safari may not be the cheapest way to visit, but flying around Namibia can be simply amazing, taking in superb scenery during flights of some 30 minutes to a few hours.

Or if you fancy a road trip, but driving yourself doesn’t appeal, how about a privately guided safari – where you are driven to the places you want to go by an expert guide with an in-depth knowledge of the country and its wildlife?

Where to stay in Namibia

From luxury lodges and safari camps to personal B&Bs and simple campsites, Namibia offers the full spectrum of places to stay. Even in the most popular destinations, such as Etosha and the Namib-Naukluft , there are a range of options that will appeal to most travel preferences.

The best lodges tend to have their own knowledgeable guides, who can add considerably to your enjoyment – of both the wilderness and the wildlife. You can expect a good standard of comfort and cuisine, and some may have extras such as spa facilities.

Guesthouses and B&Bs are something of a specialty in Namibia. A hearty breakfast is the norm, returning to a home-cooked dinner in the evening – or, in the towns, to a selection of restaurants within easy reach.

At the other end of the spectrum, camping comes into its own in Namibia’s national parks and wilderness areas – the perfect way to end the day’s adventure.

Where to see wildlife in Namibia

With its low population density and a diverse range of ecosystems inhabited by a surprising variety of wildlife, Namibia is a natural choice for a wildlife safari.

Etosha National Park, the heartland of a Namibia safari, is home to elephants, lions, giraffes, rhinos and a plethora of antelope species.

For hippos and crocodiles, make for the parks in the verdant Zambezi Region, at the east end of the Caprivi Strip, which also boasts exceptional birdlife, while for desert-adapted species, such as oryx, springbok and meerkats, the Namib-Naukluft National Park, Southern Namibia and Damaraland.

Leopards generally inhabit rocky environments, but are most easily spotted on the Okonjima Reserve. More elusive is the brown hyena, occasionally seen looming out of the mists of the Skeleton Coast & Kaokoland.

The coast also supports extensive population of Cape fur seals, along with dolphins, and even African penguins, while on the lagoons of Walvis Bay look out for flamingos and pelicans.

Read more about Wildlife in Namibia – and see our data-driven maps showing where our travellers actually saw the various wildlife species.

Namibia in context: history, environment & people

Bordered to the west by the Atlantic Ocean, Namibia’s neighbours are Angola, Botswana, and South Africa. Along with the desert landscapes of the Namib and the Kalahari, the country also features sweeping tracts of savannah, rolling hills and the vast Etosha Pan.

Namibia dates back to ancient times, when the San, Damara and Namaqua peoples roamed the land. During the 19th century it became a German colony until, as South-West Africa, it came under South African administration at the end of World War I.

Independence for the ethnically diverse population came in 1990, with
English now the official language. Afrikaans and German are also widely spoken, along with indigenous languages that include Oshiwambo, Herero and Nama.

With perennial rivers only on its northern and southern boundaries, the population was traditionally based in the north but many now live in and around the coastal towns and the capital, Windhoek.

For more on Namibia in context, read on.

Maps of Namibia: two styles

See Namibia in different ways, with two different styles of maps: a Google map and a curated Reference map.

Namibia is vast – and its low rainfall makes much of its geology exceptionally clear. Zoom into the areas and then the lodges on our maps for some amazing views of what the country is really like!

At this scale, note the apricot-orange in the south-west: the Namib Desert. Then double-click a few times to zoom in closer – and see the extraordinary patterns of the dunes themselves. Then look at the sharp, curved northern edge of the desert, where the Kuiseb River halts the march of the dunes northwards.

Double-click near “Etosha National Park”, and immediately you’ll spot the huge saltpan at the heart of Etosha.

Click onto any of the markers, and follow the links in the bubbles, for maps of these areas with precise locations for the various safari camps and lodges.


Reference map
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Understanding more about travel in Namibia

Arguably the key factor involved in a Namibia holiday is how you travel: driving yourself, flying around, or with a private guide.

The way in which you choose to travel will also be affected by your time, your budget, and your personal interests. So those on a relatively low budget with an adventurous streak and plenty of time on their hands are likely to seek an entirely different style of holiday from the time-poor traveller seeking a luxury getaway-from-it-all vacation.

For a road trip without the hands-on commitment to driving, a privately guided safari may fit the bill. And for some travellers, a combination of two or even all of these choices may work the best.


Self-drive - Car types
Self-drive - Car types

Self-drive - Car types

Driving yourself is arguably the most popular way to explore Namibia, provided you’re prepared for long days at the wheel. With total flexibility, you can create a unique adventure, experiencing the country's stunning landscapes and diverse attractions at your own pace.

Key to making this work is choosing the best type of self-drive car for your trip. A 2WD car is often sufficient, though for travelling off the beaten track – and for your ease of travel and peace of mind – we usually suggest a higher-clearance vehicle for better visibility, especially in Etosha National Park, or a 4WD for more intrepid itineraries. See examples of the Namibia's car hire groups here.

Namibia's roads are generally long, straight and relatively empty, with a tarmac surface on the main arteries, and well-maintained gravel roads elsewhere. Understanding our tips and techniques for driving on gravel roads will help you to enjoy the trip in safety.

A self-drive road trip is likely to be the cheapest option for a Namibia holiday, particularly for a family or a small group of friends travelling in one vehicle.

Self-drive - Car types

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) travel to Namibia

We have been sending travellers to Namibia since 1994 and have booked trips for many LGBT travellers in that time. We have never heard of any problems experienced on their travels due to their sexuality, and many have come back to us for regular repeat trips.

This reflects our opinion that the vast majority of people in Namibia are friendly to visitors, irrespective of the gender and sexual orientation of the visitor. So in our experience, LBGT travel here is usually fine and uneventful.

That said, it's important to be aware of both the law and the current climate of opinion. So do please check your government's latest travel advice before you go – and read more about this here:

Read more about Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) travel to Namibia.

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) travel to Namibia

Tipping in Namibia

Tipping in Namibia, as in many other countries, is always voluntary, and should depend on the standard of service received. That said, we would encourage visitors to tip in appreciation of good service, while staying mindful of the importance and extent of the work someone is doing for you.

Every successful safari or lodge stay is underpinned by a team of staff, all of whom work hard to ensure that their visitors enjoy their vacation. So when thinking about tips and tipping, do please consider them as well as your guide and your waiter, and remember to consider carefully the amount you tip.

Usually we would recommend tipping at the end of your stay in any lodge or camp, perhaps using the staff tip box, or placing your tip in a named envelope or series of envelopes so that there can be no misunderstanding.

Read more about tipping in Namibia.

Tipping in Namibia

Ideas for the best safaris & holidays in Namibia

From ephemeral rivers to the world’s highest sand dunes, wildlife parks to wilderness shores, Namibia’s diversity is legendary – and a holiday here can be as varied as the scenery. With impressive infrastructure, there are many different ways to explore:

Self-drive trips don’t need to be intrepid exploration; we’ll plan the trip with you and arrange a car, detailed maps and all the information that you’ll need to explore at your own pace.

Our fly-in safaris are perfect for those who don’t want to drive, or have very limited time, and they give a magical perspective on the country’s dramatic landscapes.

Guided safaris work particularly well for families or small groups of four or more travelling together. Then you’ll have a top private guide to take you all the way – and we can design the trip to be as adventurous as you wish.

Look through the suggestions below, then talk to us – and let us create the perfect Namibia trip for you.


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Duration
Cost
Most popular
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Caracal Self-drive Safari

14 days • 8 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

The quintessential Namibian self-drive adventure exploring the highlights from Sossusvlei and the Namib Desert to Damaraland’s wilderness and a safari in Etosha. A great mix of accommodation and excellent value.

US$2,280 - US$3,860 per person

Itinerary image

Hoopoe Fly-in Safari

11 days • 4 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

This relaxed fly-in safari reveals Namibia at its best. Generous timings and a wide choice of activities help travellers to enjoy the best of the country’s most spectacular areas.

US$5,860 - US$8,550 per person

Itinerary image

Pygmy Mouse Self-drive Safari

18 days • 10 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO VICTORIA FALLS AIRPORT

A truly epic southern African self-drive safari adventure from Namibia’s mountains and deserts, along the lush Caprivi Strip to Botswana and Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe, staying at luxury lodges throughout.

US$5,370 - US$8,680 per person

Itinerary image

Flamingo Fly-in Safari

6 days • 3 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

Short on time but big on experience, this luxury fly-in safari takes in Sossusvlei’s famous dunes and Etosha National Park’s captivating wildlife with stays at two excellent luxury lodges.

US$4,720 - US$6,440 per person

Itinerary image

Bateleur Fly-in Safari

7 days • 4 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

Classic fly-in Namibian safari staying at excellent camps. Explore Sossusvlei’s dunes and track Damaraland’s desert elephants before a safari in Etosha. Incredible scenery, good wildlife viewing and authentic cultural experiences.

US$5,560 - US$8,780 per person

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Black Wildebeest Self-drive Safari

19 days • 10 locations
CAPE TOWN AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

Journey from South Africa’s cosmopolitan Cape Town to central Namibia’s Okonjima Nature Reserve during this self-driven safari. The route passes through a stunning variety of landscapes, offering access to this beautiful continent’s rich diversity.

US$3,150 - US$3,620 per person

Itinerary image

Dune Lark Fly & Drive Safari

14 days • 8 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

A combination fly-in self-drive exploration of Namibia, with quick, easy and scenic flights in and out of Sossusvlei before a classic road trip adventure of the country’s rugged north.

US$4,330 - US$5,560 per person

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Cape Fox Guided Safari

13 days • 7 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

A classic clockwise circuit around Namibia’s northern highlights with a private guide and vehicle. We can’t think of a better way to see more in this timeframe.

US$7,620 - US$9,240 per person

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Namaqua Chameleon Self-drive

12 days • 7 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

A classic 12-night self-drive adventure around the highlights of eastern and northern Namibia taking in Sossusvlei, Swakopmund, Damaraland, Etosha and a final stop at Okonjima. Comfortable lodges and great value.

US$2,740 - US$4,370 per person

Itinerary image

Ruppell's Korhaan Fly-in Safari

9 days • 4 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

Explore Namibia’s remotest wildernesses while staying at some of the most exclusive luxury camps in the country. This epic fly-in safari will deliver otherworldly landscapes, fascinating wildlife and genuine cultural experiences.

US$9,650 - US$14,710 per person

Itinerary image

Pelican Fly & Drive Safari

10 days • 5 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

A unique itinerary visiting the must-see highlights combining the adventure of a classic Namibian self-drive with the ease and spectacular views of a fly-in safari.

US$5,500 - US$7,320 per person

Itinerary image

Brown Hyena Self-drive

14 days • 8 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

The perfect trip for those who want to mix the adventure and freedom of a self-drive with some of our favourite luxury camps in Namibia and a great mix of activities.

US$5,900 - US$7,550 per person

Showing 1-12 of 23
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Let us help you customise your trip

All of our holidays on this site are just ideas; none are fixed. All of our trips are tailor-made, so we'll always adapt them to suit you. Talk to an Expert and let us help you to work out your perfect trip.


Talk to an Expert

Call us now! We’ll match you with the Specialist in our team who is best suited to help you. Then together we can start planning your trip.

Set up your itinerary

Based on our experience and your ideas, your specialist will create a detailed, costed itinerary. We’ll refine it together, until we have a trip that you’re perfectly happy with.

Prepare for your trip

The same Specialist will make the seamless arrangements for your trip, send you detailed travel documents, and be available to answer any questions before you depart.

Travel with peace of mind

After you set off, you’ll be cared for by our partners in Africa, most of whom have worked with Expert Africa for decades. And if you ever need us urgently, we’re available 24/7.

When you return

We love to learn about your trip, and so will always be grateful if you’ve the time to give feedback to your Specialist when you return.

Special types of holiday to Namibia

With such varied terrain, Namibia suits many individual interests and styles of travel.

For a family holiday, a self-drive trip is a big adventure, combining the flexibility to choose your own route with the freedom of the open road.

Etoshais a mecca for wildlife enthusiasts, easily explored on your own or with a guide, while Walvis Bay, Sandwich Harbour and the northern rivers offer superb birding.

Top-notch lodges on a fly-in safari offer a touch of luxury, especially with options such as hot-air ballooning, while the hot springs at Ai-Ais come into their own for an affordable wellness retreat, or at the end of a tiring hike. Namibia excels at hiking too – and horseriding!

With constantly changing light and spectacular scenery – Sossusvlei at dawn; pelicans flying low over Walvis Bay lagoon; the mist-drenched emptiness of the Skeleton Coast – Namibia is a photographer’s dream.

Whatever your passion, talk to us and we’ll help to create your perfect trip.


Birdwatching

Birdwatching

Diverse habitats, discreet hides and superb guiding.

Cultural experiences

Cultural experiences

Get an insight into Africa's cultures and history.

Family holidays

Family holidays

Hand-picked camps for an incredible family safari.

Honeymoons

Honeymoons

Romantic safaris and castaway island retreats.

Luxury

Luxury

First-class service, scenic vistas and unparalleled comfort await you during these carefully selected luxury holidays. 

Photography holidays

Photography holidays

Great holidays to suit the keen photographer.

Private villas & houses

Private villas & houses

Enjoy Africa with just your friends & family

Riding holidays

Riding holidays

Explore Africa's wilderness on horseback.

Solo Travel

Solo Travel

Trip ideas ideally suited for a solo traveller.

Walking

Walking

Explore Africa's most scenic trails on foot.

Walking safaris

Walking safaris

Explore Africa's untouched wildernesses on foot.

Wellbeing

Wellbeing

Wellness escapes in stunning locations

Wildlife safaris

Wildlife safaris

These trips include hard-hitting game and fascinatingly elusive species alike, as well as superb guiding and a variety of diverse ecosystems.

Frequently Asked Questions

Namibia FAQs

Every trip to Namibia is different, but each throws up individual questions – some seemingly trivial, some crucial to the success of your holiday.

At Expert Africa, we have in-depth knowledge of the country and we’re here to help. Below are some of the questions that we’re frequently asked, from what it’s like to drive in Namibia to where to look for wildlife and whether or not you can swim in the sea.

Whatever you need to know, please contact us and we’ll do our best to help.


How to plan a Namibian road trip?

How to plan a Namibian road trip?

As with any journey, meticulous planning ensures success. You can trust our team of experts, whose experience travelling across and living in Namibia allows us to take the reins. We know the myriad destinations and stops across Namibia, and once we understand your preferences, we will expertly curate a self-drive trip to suit you perfectly.

In addition to meticulously organizing your self-drive safari, we will guide you in the choice of vehicle, ensuring that you have the right car hire
for your adventure. Then, when you arrive, a few basic steps will enhance your road journey.

Namibia's vast expanses often mean long distances between fuel stations – so set off with a full tank of fuel (and at least one spare can of fuel, if you’re heading off piste), plus at least one spare tyre.

Water and sustenance are equally vital companions, so provision yourself with plenty of snacks and water – orchestrating a full-scale picnic will appease the appetites of both body and soul. Furthermore, do not forget to shield your eyes from the sun with a sturdy pair of sunglasses and protect your skin with a generous application of suncream.

While on your Namibian Odyssey, do seize every opportunity to replenish your reserves. Then embrace the open road, for you are about to embark on an unforgettable journey through Namibia's awe-inspiring landscapes.

Can I sleep under the stars in Namibia?

With a night sky that is unrivalled in much of the industrial world, and a largely dry climate, sleeping under the stars in Namibia – sometimes dubbed ”the thousand-star hotel” – is a magical experience.

Campers are spoiled for choice, even in Etosha National Park, as well as in more remote locations such as Spitzkoppe and the Namib-Naukluft National Park.

At the other end of the spectrum, some of the top lodges, from the Skeleton Coast and Damaraland to the Namib Desert (Kuala and Little Kulala), have beds that can be rolled out under the stars for your night’s rest.

For a more adventurous experience, guests on a walking safari on the NamibRand Nature Reserve sleep on camp beds laid out in the open by their guides. Just remember to take plenty of warm clothes.

Can I visit Namibia’s diamond areas?

For many years, the desert area south of Lűderitz, where in 1908 diamonds were first discovered scattered across the ground, was off limits to visitors.

Home to Diamond Area 1, it was known as the Sperrgebiet, or “forbidden territory”. Today much of the area falls within the Sperrgebiet National Park, but access remains restricted.

For most of the region you’ll need to visit with an authorised tour operator. The eerie “ghost” town of Kolmanskop, however, can be visited by self-drivers – although you’ll still need a permit.

For the history, the flora, the sheer remoteness, visiting places such as Elizabeth Bay and the ghost town of Pomona may take some planning, but it is worth the bureaucracy.

What coastal activities does Namibia offer?

Namibia may have 1,570km of coastline, but thanks to vast expanses of desert, and the presence of diamonds, much of it is inaccessible – which in part adds to the appeal.

Sea swimming isn’t generally an option except in Swakopmund & Walvis Bay and Lűderitz. Courtesy of the Benguela Current, the waters of the Atlantic are cold – even by British standards! – and can be treacherous.

Against this, kayaking at Walvis Bay, where Cape fur seals see you as part of their morning’s entertainment, is a must for watersports and wildlife lovers alike.

Boat tours provide similar opportunities without the exercise, while in Lűderitz they offer the additional opportunity of seeing African penguins.

Fishing, too, can be organised in the coastal towns, while hiking along the beaches of the Skeleton Coast, littered with whalebones, gives a whole new meaning to a walk by the sea.

How long does a Namibia safari holiday take?

The highlights of Namibia – Sossusvlei’s dunes, Damaraland and Etosha National Park – can comfortably be fitted into a week’s holiday, if you fly around, making this a perfect itinerary for those with limited vacation time.

Those with a more time usually build on the highlights, perhaps driving around and including a stop for activities at Swoakpmund, time leopard-spotting on the Okonjima Reserve, or a visit to one of Namibia’s many less famous guest farms and lodges.

If you have longer, the options are many and varied. For sheer desolate wilderness, the Skeleton Coast is a must, while the awe-inspiring scenery of Fish River Canyon is more than a match.

To gain a glimpse of Namibia’s indigenous cultures, you’ll need to head north to the Himba villages nestled in the stark, arid landscape of Kaokoland. Or seek out the homelands of the San, or Bushmen, in Bushmanland, on the country’s eastern borders with Botswana.

Our other African destinations

Namibia’s scenic diversity is among its greatest appeals, but if you’re after a stronger focus on wildlife or water activities, take a look at some other Expert Africa destinations.

Neighbouring Botswana stands out for the iconic Okavango Delta, where vast private reserves offer exclusive wildlife watching. Zambia, too, boasts exceptional wildlife and intimate camps, many of them owner-operated. For a more rustic safari, consider Zimbabwe, whose safari guides are some of the best in the world, or head east to the open grasslands of Tanzania.

Water lovers will be in their element in South Africa, as well as in east Africa, where Kenya, Mozambique and Malawi beckon. Or for a true castaway experience, the islands of Zanzibar and the Seychelles make superb add-ons to a safari. And then there’s Rwanda, with that once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to come face to face with mountain gorillas. The choices are many and varied, so contact us to help you design your perfect safari – wherever that may be.


Botswana

Botswana

With big game, glamorous lodges and one of the greatest unspoilt wildernesses on Earth, Botswana is perhaps Africa's most exclusive safari destination.

Read more about Botswana
Kenya

Kenya

Humanity’s ancestors lived in Kenya, which is now home to people speaking 42 languages, and some of Africa’s rarest, most magnificent wildlife.

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Malawi

Malawi

With tropical rivers, Rift Valley plateaux, the crystal-clear waters of Lake Malawi and a stunning lakeshore, Malawi invites relaxed exploration.

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Mozambique

Mozambique

An ocean paradise protected by world-class marine parks, Mozambique’s idyllic archipelagos offer heavenly hideaways, outstanding diving and laid-back luxury.

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Rwanda

Rwanda

This small, mountainous country offers Africa’s best gorilla treks, other good safari options and a profound human element in every trip.

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Seychelles

Seychelles

The ultimate glamorous getaway: the lush islands of Seychelles are enchantingly beautiful and stylish sanctuaries for both wildlife and ocean-lovers.

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South Africa

South Africa

Cosmopolitan Cape Town, world-class wineries, brilliant ‘Big Five’ safaris and spectacularly diverse scenery make South African holidays fabulously exciting and enjoyable.

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Tanzania

Tanzania

East Africa’s biggest country has a wide range of parks to explore and some of the Indian Ocean’s best island retreats.

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Zambia

Zambia

Home to walking safaris, exceptional wildlife, superb guiding and the mighty Victoria Falls, Zambia is Africa at its most alluring.

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Zanzibar

Zanzibar

The ultimate Spice Island: Zanzibar’s mystique, marine life and chic beach retreats make it Africa’s most alluring archipelago.

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Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe

Stunning national parks teeming with game, plus Africa's finest professional guides and the spectacular Victoria Falls: Zimbabwe is enthralling.

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Elephant safari
in Linyanti

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