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Namibia
Namibia
Namibia
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Namibia
Namibia
Namibia
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Namibia
Namibia
Namibia
Namibia

Immerse yourself in spectacular scenery

Soar over the world's oldest desert in a hot air balloon

Namibia is home to world's largest cheetah population

Enjoy a bird's eye view of Namibia's vastness

Escape to the Skeleton Coast

Etosha is full of photographic opportunities

Find solitude beside the Kunene River

Etosha has a healthy lion population

Enjoy excellent for hiking, both guided & self-guided

Track desert-adapted elephants in damaraland

Enjoy a front row seat to the wildlife action

Visit colonies of Cape fur seals along the Namibian coast.

Namibia

Map of Namibia's holiday & safari areas

See Namibia in different ways, with different styles of maps.


Our map of Namibia

This a sketch map of Namibia – showing its key road arteries, national parks, towns, and areas of interest for visitors.

Reference map

Google map of Namibia

Explore Namibia's huge diversity with this Google map; click the 'satellite' button (top-left of the map) to get topographical view showing the sands of the deserts clearly. See our Reference map here.

Things to see on this Namibia map


Namibia is a vast country – and its low rainfall means that much of its geology is amazingly visible. Zoom into the areas and then the lodges on our maps for some really amazing views of what the country is really like!

At this scale – note the apricot-orange in the south-west of the country: it's the Namib Desert. Then double-click a few times on them to zoom in closer – and see the amazing patterns of the dunes themselves. Move to the north-east of this dune area, and see the inroads that the Tsondab and Tsauchab have made into the dunes. Look at the sharp, curved northern edge of the desert – where the Kuiseb River halts the march of the dunes northwards.

Double-click anywhere near the 'Etosha National Park' marker to see a little closer, and immediately spot the huge saltpan at the heart of Etosha.

Click onto any of the markers, and follow the links in the bubbles, for maps of these areas with precise locations for the various safari camps and lodges.

Our top trips in Namibia

Here are 26 great Namibia trips to inspire you.


Itinerary image

Chongololo Self-drive Safari

21 days • 11 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

This self-drive safari focuses on the best walking experiences in Namibia. Get your boots ready for the apricot dunes of the Namib Desert and the ancient hills of Damaraland.

US$7,130 - US$7,910 per person

Itinerary image

Hartebeest Self-drive Safari

16 days • 8 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

This self-drive safari focuses on the best cultural experiences in Namibia. Visit a Himba village and enjoy three days living with the San Bushmen interspersed with some excellent wildlife watching.

US$4,160 - US$4,560 per person

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Rock Hare Self-drive Safari

20 days • 12 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO VICTORIA FALLS AIRPORT

An in-depth look at Namibia from the Namib Desert to the Caprivi, with additional stops in Botswana and Victoria Falls. This three-week adventure includes an unrivalled mix of environments and is great value.

US$5,260 - US$6,660 per person

Itinerary image

Caracal Self-drive Safari

14 days • 8 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

The quintessential Namibian self-drive adventure exploring the highlights from Sossusvlei and the Namib Desert to Damaraland’s wilderness and a safari in Etosha. A great mix of accommodation and excellent value.

US$2,610 - US$3,480 per person

Itinerary image

Dune Lark Fly & Drive Safari

14 days • 8 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

A combination fly-in self-drive exploration of Namibia, with quick, easy and scenic flights in and out of Sossusvlei before a classic road trip adventure of the country’s rugged north.

US$5,720 - US$6,120 per person

Itinerary image

Brown Hyena Self-drive

14 days • 8 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

The perfect trip for those who want to mix the adventure and freedom of a self-drive with some of our favourite luxury camps in Namibia and a great mix of activities.

US$6,280 - US$7,090 per person

Itinerary image

Quiver Tree Self-drive Safari

14 days • 7 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

An offbeat Namibian self-drive adventure exploring the epic Fish River Canyon and fascinating Kolmanskop ghost town in the south, before turning north via the classic highlights of Sossusvlei, Swakopmund and Damaraland.

US$2,580 - US$2,660 per person

Itinerary image

Black Wildebeest Self-drive Safari

19 days • 10 locations
CAPE TOWN AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

Journey from South Africa’s cosmopolitan Cape Town to central Namibia’s Okonjima Nature Reserve during this self-driven safari. The route passes through a stunning variety of landscapes, offering access to this beautiful continent’s rich diversity.

US$3,910 - US$4,010 per person

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Cape Fox Guided Safari

13 days • 7 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

A classic clockwise circuit around Namibia’s northern highlights with a private guide and vehicle. We can’t think of a better way to see more in this timeframe.

US$6,980 - US$10,320 per person

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Black-faced Impala Guided Safari

13 days • 6 locations
WINDHOEK AIRPORT TO WINDHOEK AIRPORT

A unique mix of luxury and adventure in our original, and perhaps most varied, destination on a privately guided Namibian overland safari. Perfect for families, friends or couples travelling together.

US$6,970 - US$9,710 per person

View all holidays in Namibia

When to go to Namibia

Our month-by-month guide to the best time for visiting Namibia


Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Namibia in January

January is at the heart of Namibia’s rainy season. However, as you’d expect from a country dominated by desert and semi-desert environments, the rains are often (but not always) weak and usually quite localised. Some days will be clear, the strong sun raising temperatures to around 30ºC/86ºF; on others humidity and clouds build, sometimes culminating in spectacular thunderstorms. In extreme cases, these generate flash-floods which race down the beds of ephemeral rivers.

Across the country, the greening landscape makes a refreshing change, especially in desert areas. Many birds are in full breeding plumage and migrant species are here in force. In the north, where the rains are more reliable, the abundant water and food allows wildlife to disperse, making it trickier to spot.

  • Variable weather: clear, hot & dry, or cloudy & humid with some rain
  • Occasional, highly localised thunderstorms
  • Many animals with young; birdlife at its most spectacular
  • Wildlife dispersed & harder to see, especially in Etosha & the Caprivi
  • Very few tourists (apart from the New Year) so rates mostly low

Our view

This is not a great time to visit

Weather in January

Namibia in February

February is the wettest month, but as Namibia is dominated by deserts, the rains are often weak and patchy. The variation in weather across Namibia is significant, too; the central highlands and Caprivi can see some heavy rain. More typically, some February days are clear with a hot, strong sun; others are cooler as cloudy skies build and, sometimes, culminate in short, spectacular thunderstorms. Occasionally these generate flash-floods, bringing ephemeral rivers to life and making travel more challenging.

Across the country, the landscape feels green and alive; insects and smaller animals are more easily seen, and many birds and animals are raising their young. However, small pools in the bush and thicker vegetation can make it hard to spot the wildlife.

  • Variable weather: clear, hot & dry or cloudy & humid with some rain
  • Occasional localised thunderstorms meander over the landscape
  • The bush feels alive; birdlife is at its most spectacular
  • Wildlife in Etosha & Caprivi is dispersed & harder to see
  • Few tourists, so rates usually at their lowest

Our view

This is not a great time to visit

Weather in February

Namibia in March

March usually sees Namibia’s main rains tailing off, although actual precipitation varies hugely across the country and can be unpredictable from day to day. Many days will be clear, with a strong sun driving temperatures up. On others, clouds will build, and the late afternoon may see a short, spectacular thunderstorm. Such deluges reduce in both frequency and volume as the month progresses.

Across the country, landscapes are often vivid: a “green and pleasant land”. Many birds and animals are finishing raising their young, so smaller animals and insects are in evidence. In the north, where rains are generally heavier, pools in the bush and thicker vegetation can make it difficult to spot larger animals.

  • Variable weather: clear, hot & dry or cloudy & humid with some rain
  • Afternoon thunderstorms less common as March progresses
  • Animals looking sleek and well-fed, after 3–4 months of plenty
  • Wildlife in Etosha & Caprivi is dispersed & harder to see
  • Few tourists visit during March, so rates often low

Our view

A good time to visit, with pros & cons

Weather in March

Namibia in April

Typically, April is dominated by dry weather; there’s an ever-decreasing chance of rain. Temperatures are now below their peak and continue to fall. Even so, days remain pleasant and warm, but there might be a slight chill in the air at night. The rains usually leave many parts of the country verdant and green, so animals are in fantastic condition – often with fast-growing young in attendance.

With the dust washed out of the atmosphere, photographers make the most of clear air, spectacular landscapes and healthy animals. Stargazers will have clearer night skies as the month progresses. In the game parks of Northern Namibia, water and food remain in plentiful supply, so finding big game can prove trickier than later in the year.

  • Becoming drier &, especially at night, also cooler
  • Few visitors, except around Easter, so rates remain low
  • Wildlife in Etosha & Caprivi remains relatively hard to see
  • Migrant birds have started to leave
  • Fresh, clean air and often green, verdant landscapes

Our view

A good time to visit, with pros & cons

Weather in April

Namibia in May

By May, Namibia is usually drying out fast as the rains have ended. If they’ve been good, then the land remains green, but wildlife starts to congregate at more permanent water sources. Over much of the country the air quality and clarity can be amazing, making this an ideal month for photography.

Typical days are warm, with crisp, clear mornings and clear blue skies. Evenings are usually cool, and temperatures may dip below 10ºC (50ºF) overnight. Many lodges still charge “low season” prices, although with Namibia’s increasing popularity in recent years, some have started to introduce higher “shoulder season” rates.

May’s good-value rates, increasingly good wildlife sightings, beautiful landscapes and crystal-clear air combine to make this one of our favourite months in Namibia.

  • Lovely weather: dry, warm days & cool nights
  • The country is drying out although many landscapes remain green
  • Fantastic air clarity – ideal for keen photographers
  • Visitor numbers are often still low, mirrored by lodge rates
  • Wildlife is starting to congregate more around remaining water

Our view

Fantastic: the very best time to visit

Weather in May

Namibia in June

Namibia is dry again. Skies are blue and usually largely cloudless. Days are lovely: warm and dry; nights are cold, sometimes below freezing in the desert. Most swimming pools in Namibia are always outdoors, making them too cold for all except the very dedicated.

Take a warm hat and gloves for game drives, where dawn and dusk will feel particularly chilly. In the north, especially Etosha, wildlife viewing is now into its dry-season pattern, focusing around the waterholes – though the park is still not busy.

Photographers come for superb air clarity, with minimal dust or smoke in the air. Historically, June rates have been low. However, with Namibia’s increasing popularity many lodges now count it amongst their “high-season” months, and request higher prices.

  • Clear, bright days with blue skies; cold nights, mornings & evenings
  • Great air quality, especially welcome for photographers
  • “Shoulder season” for some lodges: lodge rates moderate
  • Wildlife gravitates to waterholes, making game-viewing productive
  • Some greenery in the landscape, depending on the last rains

Our view

A very good time to visit

Weather in June

Namibia in July

Reliably warm daytime temperatures (upwards of 20ºC/70ºF) and good wildlife sightings make this a popular month to visit Namibia. Rain would be very unusual indeed and clear skies make for great photographs. Once the sun sets, though, temperatures cool rapidly bringing cold nights that may dip below freezing in the desert. Be prepared: dress in layers and expect early-morning and late-afternoon drives, and anywhere coastal, to be cold.

As the land dries and vegetation shrivels, game congregates beside drinking water: Etosha’s waterholes are busy with animals. Across the country, lodges charge “high season” rates; many are fully booked a year or more in advance, especially during European school holidays (from the latter half of July to late August).

  • Dry days, warm in the sun, with crisp, cold nights
  • Cloudless skies: July is usually superb for stargazing
  • The beginning of European school holidays so more families travelling
  • Peak season: so high rates and many lodges fully booked far in advance
  • A fantastic time of year for wildlife watching, particularly in Etosha

Our view

A very good time to visit

Weather in July

Namibia in August

August is the height of Namibia’s “winter”. Expect cloudless skies and plenty of warm sun in the day, but nights down to freezing in the desert. Dress in layers and bring warm clothes (including hats and gloves) for chilly starts and evenings. Only the hardiest even contemplate using outdoor pools.

It’s 3–4 months since any rain, so the land is dust-dry and much vegetation is golden brown. Many landscapes appear sparse and harsh. Wildlife congregates around available water sources, helping to guarantee good animal sightings.

Namibia is never really “busy” by the standards of Europe or the USA, but August is the most popular time to visit, especially for families. Book early (over a year in advance) if you want to stay at the best lodges.

  • Dry days, warm in the sun; cold mornings, evenings & nights
  • Cloudless skies in the day; spectacular stars at night
  • Busy by Namibian standards: family rooms in particular demand
  • Peak season: so high rates and many lodges fully booked far in advance
  • A fantastic time of year for wildlife watching, particularly in Etosha

Our view

A very good time to visit

Weather in August

Namibia in September

September is a month of blue, cloudless skies and fantastic wildlife viewing. Rain is almost unheard of. As the month progresses, the days and nights get warmer. In some areas, daily maximums hit around the low 30s Celsius, although low humidity ensures this feels comfortable. The contrast makes the nights seem very cold. The air is becoming dustier, occasionally augmented by smoke from fires – so becoming hazy for photographic purists.

In the national parks, animals congregate around remaining water sources – making September one of the best months for game viewing. Hence it’s one of Namibia’s most popular months for visitors: a “high season” month that is often the time of choice for safari aficionados.

  • One of the best months for wildlife viewing
  • Warm days & cold nights, with temperatures rising during the month
  • Many plants have faded from green to golden brown
  • Air can be hazy – with dust & sometimes smoke
  • High season rates; many lodges & camps are full 9 months in advance.

Our view

Fantastic: the very best time to visit

Weather in September

Namibia in October

Namibia is usually at its hottest and driest in October. Temperatures build as the month progresses; towards the end, daily highs may exceed 40ºC/100ºF, though with humidity close to zero, even this rarely feels oppressive.

In exceptional years, isolated rain showers may fall in late October. More usually, the end of the dry season sees wildlife watching at its best, particularly in Etosha. The place feels like a desert as spectacular herds of thirsty animals gather around the available water. October is popular amongst wildlife enthusiasts and commands peak-season prices, even if dust and smoke may make the air hazy, challenging photographers. Visitor numbers can fade towards the end of the month, allowing a window for last-minute bookings.

  • Probably the most spectacular month for wildlife-viewing in Etosha
  • Hot and dry: much of the country feels like a desert
  • The air can be hazy with dust & smoke
  • It’s peak time to visit, so expect high season rates
  • Lodges & camps are full, especially early in October

Our view

Fantastic: the very best time to visit

Weather in October

Namibia in November

November is always a bit unpredictable: sometimes dry and hot; sometimes cloudier and cooler. Typically, mornings are hot and cloudless and clouds appear in the afternoon. Humidity builds and eventually breaks, resulting in spectacular thunderstorms that bring convection rainfall in late afternoons. Such storms are typically sparsely distributed and highly local – being completely absent from desert areas, for example. Places that do get good rain will flush green, with a tangible feeling of new life softening the landscapes. Many mammals give birth to their young.

Once any rains come, wildlife dissipates in search of food, and game viewing in Etosha becomes harder. Conversely, this is a great time for birdwatchers, with migrant species in breeding plumage.

  • A very interesting, variable month, depending on the rains
  • With rains come an amazing explosion of both vegetation & new life
  • Wildlife viewing better in Damaraland than Etosha if it has rained
  • Shoulder season: mid-range rates offer great value
  • Away from the Namib, showers are more likely later in the month

Our view

A good time to visit, with pros & cons

Weather in November

Namibia in December

December is the first “proper” month of Namibia’s rainy season, and one of its hottest. Clear mornings give way to building clouds and, with luck, the occasional short, spectacular thunderstorm: refreshing and cleansing. These are often highly localised and generally warmly welcomed: most Namibians love rain!

Rains clear the air of dust. Even relatively short showers enable plant life to erupt, carpeting this thirstland in green and providing food for the young animals which abound. Animals disperse widely, which can make game viewing challenging. Many birds are breeding and so sporting their most colourful plumage.

Christmas and the New Year fall within local “summer holidays” – so places to stay can be surprisingly busy, especially in and around coastal towns, where temperatures are cooler.

  • Hot and humid; sometimes refreshed by cooling showers
  • Landscapes flushed green if/where there has been rain
  • A tangible life and energy amidst this often green & pleasant land
  • Very photogenic: blooming deserts amidst crystal-clear air
  • Best time for birdwatchers; larger animals harder to spot

Our view

This is not a great time to visit

Weather in December

Where to find the key wildlife species in Namibia

Understand the detail of where our travellers have most frequently seen the main big game species in Namibia.


Oryx

Oryx

Oryx sp.

Oryx are impressive antelopes, with a powerful physique and elegant markings set off by rapier-like horns. They cut a distinctive dash in some of Africa’s harshest landscapes.

69% SUCCESS

669 sightings from 963 observations

Where to see oryx in Namibia

Cheetah

Cheetah

Acinonyx jubatus

The cheetah is the fastest land animal and the only cat that hunts by pure speed. Found largely in open grasslands, its slim, elegant form is today an increasingly rare sight.

29% SUCCESS

444 sightings from 1,517 observations

Where to see cheetah in Namibia

Black Rhino

Black Rhino

Diceros bicornis

The black rhino is the smaller and rarer of Africa’s two rhino species but has the more fearsome reputation. Shy and heavily persecuted, it tends to stick to cover.

29% SUCCESS

272 sightings from 941 observations

Where to see black rhino in Namibia

White Rhino

White Rhino

Ceratotherium simum

The white rhino is the largest and most numerous of the world’s five rhinoceros species. They are larger, easier to see and generally more approachable than the black rhino.

43% SUCCESS

226 sightings from 530 observations

Where to see white rhino in Namibia

Elephant

Elephant

Loxodonta africana

By far the biggest of the so-called Big Five – indeed, the largest land animal on the planet – the elephant shapes the very landscape it inhabits and is a defining presence on any safari.

91% SUCCESS

1,667 sightings from 1,841 observations

Where to see elephant in Namibia

Lion

Lion

Panthera leo

Lions are at the top of the food chain and also most safari wish-lists, but with their numbers falling fast, any encounter with these majestic apex predators always feels like a privilege.

80% SUCCESS

1,377 sightings from 1,732 observations

Where to see lion in Namibia

Meerkat

Meerkat

Suricata suricatta

These highly sociable little mammals have an endearing appearance and comical antics. Found in the drier areas of Southern Africa, close encounters are a sought-after experience.

20% SUCCESS

40 sightings from 199 observations

Where to see meerkat in Namibia

Buffalo

Buffalo

Syncerus caffer

One of the ‘Big Five’, buffalo earned a fearsome reputation in hunters’ tales. By contrast, big herds of these sociable bovids are placid, but mount formidable defences against predators.

83% SUCCESS

1,171 sightings from 1,405 observations

Where to see buffalo in Namibia

Giraffe

Giraffe

Giraffa camelopardalis

The world’s tallest land mammal, giraffes are herbivores which have evolved many unique adaptations. Their iconic outlines tower above the bush in many of Africa’s wildlife areas.

83% SUCCESS

1,595 sightings from 1,916 observations

Where to see giraffe in Namibia

Hippo

Hippo

Hippopotamus amphibius

The territorial calls of the hippo create a signature soundtrack to Africa’s rivers & wetlands. Despite an endearing smile, this aquatic herbivore has a notoriously aggressive disposition.

89% SUCCESS

1,225 sightings from 1,376 observations

Where to see hippo in Namibia

Spotted Hyena

Spotted Hyena

Crocuta crocuta

The spotted hyena may be thought of as ‘ugly’ and ‘cowardly’. In fact, this versatile and intelligent carnivore is one of Africa’s most fascinating and warrants attention on any safari.

51% SUCCESS

958 sightings from 1,887 observations

Where to see spotted hyena in Namibia

Brown Hyena

Brown Hyena

Parahyaena brunnea

This largely solitary scavenger is one of the more elusive and little-known of Africa’s carnivores. Shaggier than its spotted cousin, it occurs only in the arid southwest of the continent.

16% SUCCESS

116 sightings from 736 observations

Where to see brown hyena in Namibia

Leopard

Leopard

Panthera pardus

The most numerous of Africa’s big cats, leopard occur across many habitats, from wild tracts to populated areas. Their grace and their elusive nature make them a unique safari drawcard.

45% SUCCESS

882 sightings from 1,962 observations

Where to see leopard in Namibia

Wild dog

Wild dog

Lycaon pictus

African wild dogs are among the continent’s most compelling animals. Much misunderstood, these rare, tie-dyed canids are amazingly efficient hunters with a fascinating social life.

31% SUCCESS

397 sightings from 1,274 observations

Where to see wild dog in Namibia

Wildebeest

Wildebeest

Connochaetes sp.

Superficially bovine in appearance, wildebeests are known for their spectacular migrations sometimes in huge numbers. These resilient animals are some of Africa’s most successful herbivores.

64% SUCCESS

1,115 sightings from 1,749 observations

Where to see wildebeest in Namibia

Pangolin

Pangolin

Smutsia sp.

Pangolins appear to be more pine cone than animal in their unique armoury of scales. These nocturnal, ant-eating oddities are not only highly elusive but also increasingly rare.

2% SUCCESS

31 sightings from 1,560 observations

Where to see pangolin in Namibia

Aardvark

Aardvark

Orycteropus afer

The aardvark is one of Africa’s most bizarre and enigmatic animals. A shy, nocturnal termite-eater, signs of its presence may be scattered about the bush whilst sightings remain elusive.

3% SUCCESS

47 sightings from 1,642 observations

Where to see aardvark in Namibia

Eland

Eland

Taurotragus oryx

Africa’s largest antelope, eland are culturally important from prehistoric rock art to modern game farms. Though widespread, they are also shy so sightings are uncommon and often fleeting.

45% SUCCESS

644 sightings from 1,425 observations

Where to see eland in Namibia

Zebra

Zebra

Equus sp.

The zebra is a quintessential African animal: the horse in stripy pyjamas at the end of every child’s A–Z. There are three species, of which the plains zebra is much the most common.

84% SUCCESS

1,804 sightings from 2,158 observations

Where to see zebra in Namibia

Roan antelope

Roan antelope

Hippotragus equinus

Africa’s second largest antelope and one of its most handsome, with a powerful build and distinctive markings, roan are wary of people, but renowned for their bravery against predators.

24% SUCCESS

241 sightings from 1,000 observations

Where to see roan antelope in Namibia

Sable antelope

Sable antelope

Hippotragus niger

Perhaps Africa’s most beautiful antelope, sable are renowned for their combative nature, even holding off lions. Shy and restricted in range, sightings of sable are always special.

21% SUCCESS

208 sightings from 992 observations

Where to see sable antelope in Namibia

Sitatunga

Sitatunga

Tragelaphus spekii

The sitatunga is the most aquatic of Africa’s antelopes and specially adapted to its swampy habitats. Though widespread across Africa, only a handful of places offer reliable sightings.

20% SUCCESS

26 sightings from 127 observations

Where to see sitatunga in Namibia

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